Overview

Welcome to the Department of Demography at the University of Texas at San Antonio!

The Department of Demography provides training intended to increase the understanding of the size, distribution, composition and growth of human populations. Our program focuses on developing an understanding of the conceptual basis of population structure, processes, analytical methods, and related policy issues. We offer a Ph.D. in Applied Demography and the focus of the Ph.D. program is on the application of demographic analysis analyses to policy issues encountered in the public and private sectors.

The Department, through the College of Public Policy, provides financial support as many as 8 full time students. The Departmental Office and most faculty offices are located on the second floor of the University’s Monterey Building.

The Department of Demography was established and the Ph.D. in Applied Demography was approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in January of 2006. The first class of students enrolled in the Fall Semester 2006.

The Applied Demography Society (Graduate Student Organization)

Giving:

Contributions to COPP/UTSA provide student scholarships, research fellowships, faculty research support, new programs that benefit students and the general public, endowed chairs, a source of flexible funds, and more.

301 South Frio Street

Monterey Building 2.270

San Antonio, TX 78207

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About Us


Chair's Welcome

¡Bienvenidos!

On behalf of the Department of Social Work, welcome! Students entering the Master of Social Work (MSW) program in UTSA’s College of Public Policy are joining a dedicated community of social work professionals and supporters transforming lives in San Antonio and across the country.

Our accredited program is committed to culturally competent transformative social work. Our students, alumni, faculty, staff, and community supporters are what make our social work community unique. Their commitment to the profession of social work and their collaborative spirits are making a difference in the San Antonio area and beyond. Our innovative, holistic curriculum prepares students to meet the challenges of the 21st century. The curriculum spans the micro-macro continuum and provides comprehensive knowledge and skills for intervention at multiple service levels. We invite students to dive in and fully engage in all this program offers.

It’s an honor to serve as chair of the department, working with our program vision in the forefront of my mind: to serve as catalysts for transformative culturally competent social work. I can’t think of any work I would rather be doing, given critical issues individuals, families, and communities confront on a daily basis. Social workers seek to advance values of integrity, service, competence, social justice, human relationships, and the dignity and worth of each person. We are fortunate that our MSW program is embedded in the UTSA context, with the university endorsing core values of dialogue, discovery, integrity, excellence, inclusiveness, respect, collaboration, and innovation. Learning and transformation often involve challenge. These values guide faculty, staff, and students as we learn and act together. We welcome your interest in this special community.

Amy Chanmugam
Associate Professor and Department Chair


History

The UTSA Department of Social Work was founded by Dr. Dennis Haynes. It has grown significantly since its inaugural cohort of 17 students entered in January 2005. Initially, the program focused on meeting the needs of working professionals interested in attending school part-time, and all classes were offered in the evening. The program was fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) in February, 2008, with reaffirmation in June 2012, making it a CSWE accredited program through 2020. Graduates work in professional positions serving diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. They demonstrate commitment to social responsibility, cultural competence, and community collaboration within an inter-professional and global context.

The program has grown rapidly, with a current enrollment of over 200 students, and increased numbers of full-time students. A small number of day classes are now offered. This website introduces our faculty and their areas of research expertise, as well as our staff, including members of the Department of Field Education. Through the Title IV-E (SWEPT) program, we have also been able to offer the program to cohorts in Corpus Christi. The UTSA social work student body is diverse, with both non-traditional and traditional students representing a range of ages, ethnic groups, work and educational experiences, ideas, and interests. We strive to create a community of learners, incorporating a transformative education paradigm throughout all course work. Emphasis is placed on facilitating the transformation of students' perspectives, so they in turn can facilitate the transformation of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

Contact Us

The Department of Social Work is located within the College of Public Policy at the UTSA Downtown Campus, 501 West César Chávez Blvd. San Antonio, TX 78207, Frio St. Building Room 4.544.

Phone: (210) 458-3000

Fax: (210) 458-3001

Email: swk@utsa.edu

Faculty openings

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

The Department of Social Work at The University of Texas at San Antonio seeks to fill three departmental faculty positions to begin in the Fall Semester, 2018: one at the Associate Professor level and two at the Assistant Professor level. Each professorial position hired will be based on qualifications and pending budget approval. Applicants must indicate the professorial rank at which they would like to be considered. Tenure is contingent upon Board of Regents approval.

UTSA is a Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) that is one of the fastest growing public universities in Texas and gaining momentum in its quest to become the state’s next premier Tier 1 university. It serves the San Antonio metropolitan area, the seventh largest U.S. city, and the broader region of South Texas through programs and services offered from its three campuses. More than 57% of UTSA's students come from groups underrepresented in higher education. Many students are the first in their families to attend a college or university.

The UTSA Department of Social Work, the first publicly funded graduate social work program in San Antonio, began in 2005 with 17 MSW students; current MSW student enrollment is more than 200. Capitalizing on its location in San Antonio and its commitment to South Texas, the Program offers a single concentration in cultural competence, with an innovative micro to macro framework. The Program’s mission is to develop socially responsible, culturally competent social work professionals within a transformative and global context. The UTSA MSW Program was accredited by the Council on Social Work Education in 2008. The majority of our students are working professionals with considerable diversity in life experience and ideas. More details about the Program and faculty research can be found at: http://copp.utsa.edu/department/category/social-work.

Required qualifications for Assistant rank applicants: 1) a Ph.D. in Social Work or a closely related discipline; 2) a MSW from a CSWE accredited program; 3) a demonstrated commitment to cultural competence and working with diverse populations; and 4) research, scholarship and strong potential for external fund development. Preferred applicant qualifications include at least two years post-MSW practice experience. Candidates applying at the assistant rank who are currently ABD will be considered.

Required qualifications for Associate rank applicants: 1) a Ph.D. in Social Work or a closely related discipline; 2) a MSW from a CSWE accredited program; 3) a demonstrated commitment to cultural competence and working with diverse populations; 4) must have proven active success for tenured faculty in external fund development, research and scholarship; and 5) must have a solid record of mentoring, teaching and service. Preferred applicant qualifications include at least two years post-MSW practice experience.

Applications with all areas of expertise will be considered; we especially encourage applications in the areas of policy, aging/gerontology, mental health/substance abuse, and child welfare. Qualified applicants must submit: 1) a letter of interest to include a statement concerning applicant’s research agenda, teaching philosophy and potential for external grant funding; 2) current curriculum vita; 3) one representative published, forthcoming, or potentially publishable work; and 4) full contact information for three references. All materials must be submitted through: https://jobs.utsa.edu. When entering the portal, click on the “Faculty” tab to find the position announcement. Direct any questions to Dr. Richard Harris, Professor and Search Committee Chair, Department of Social Work, University of Texas at San Antonio. 501 W. César E. Chávez Boulevard, San Antonio, Texas 78207-4415. Phone: 210-458-2843; E-mail: Richard.Harris@utsa.edu.

Initial screening of completed applications will begin October 9, 2017, and will be open until positions are filled. Search Committee members will be available at the APM to provide position information and meet with potential applicants. UTSA is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Women, minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants who are selected for interviews must be able to show proof that they will be eligible and qualified to work in the United States by time of hire. 

Click here to download PDF for the ad.

Summer Camp Itinerary

Publications

Coming Soon

Events & Announcements

Fall 2017 Events

Sept. 14 - Demography Lecture Series with Dr. Marc Garcia | 12PM| MNT 3.250

2017 Announcements

Dr. Johnelle Sparks selected as new Department Chair

The UTSA Graduate Council has approved a series of concentrations for the Applied Demography degree as a partnership with the UTSA Department of Sociology. For details, consult the graduate catalog.

Check out College of Public Policy's new video!

Events

Events

Mar. 7 - Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Table Recruiting | 1:30 p.m. - 3 p.m. | McKinney Humanities Bldg., 2nd Floor (all majors welcome)

Mar. 7 - CDC Information Session | 4:45 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. | Retama Auditorium UC 2.02.02

Mar. 27 - Demography Lecture Series with Dr. Barbara Bird | noon - 1pm | MNT 3.240

Career Center Events

Mar. 7 - Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Table Recruiting | 1:30 p.m. - 3 p.m. | McKinney Humanities Bldg., 2nd Floor (all majors welcome)

Mar. 7 - CDC Information Session | 4:45 p.m. - 6:15 p.m. | Retama Auditorium UC 2.02.02

Announcements

National Science Foundation offers PAID summer research experience in community geography and GIS!

Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) has opened up applications for academic and annual conference scholarships. Apply at www.hacu.net/scholarships

Congressman Joaquin Castro is seeking interns for his district office!

The Institute for Economic Development Research Office needs part-time researchers! ($10.50/hr and 19 hrs per week)

Magdalena Ministries, Inc. is hiring for Program Administrator.
Download Job Description
Download Employment Application

Fall 2016 Downtown Campus Updates (click to download PDF)

Check out College of Public Policy's new video!

Contact Us

Address

The University of Texas at San Antonio
College of Public Policy
Department of Public Administration
Durango Bldg., Room 4.114
501 W. César E. Chávez Blvd.
San Antonio, TX 78207

Phone:  (210) 458-2533

Office Hours:  Monday - Friday | 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Software License Support

The College of Public Policy is pleased to offer faculty and students the opportunity to apply for software license support. Applications must provide a detailed rationale tied to research productivity and/or graduation.

Announcement and Application available to download here:

Software Announcement

Software Support Application

Software License Support

The College of Public Policy is pleased to offer faculty and students the opportunity to apply for software license support. Applications must provide a detailed rationale tied to research productivity and/or graduation.

Announcement and Application available to download here:

Software Announcement

Software Support Application

Scholarships

  •  2017-2018 Scholarship applications have closed. Please return next year to apply for 2018-2019 opportunities.




New Minor in Civic Engagement

Minor in Civic Engagement

The Minor in Civic Engagement is designed as an interdisciplinary minor that is open to all majors in the University.  All students pursuing the Minor in Civic Engagement must complete 18 semester credit hours.  The Diversity of Communities courses provide students with an opportunity to become competent in a variety of cultural and environmental influences in our society.  The Civic Infrastructure courses provide students the opportunity to become competent in the institutions, structures, and systems that affect our community.  In addition to the required courses, students will choose two additional courses from each of these competency areas.

Click here to download the program flyer 1

I. Required courses 

Foundations of Civic Engagement (3 hour credit – PAD 2073) This foundational course provides students with an understanding of civic participation, civic literacy and the necessary skill set for completion of the minor. It is designed to guide students in making links between their major area of study and the communities in which they work and live in order to help prepare students for a lifetime of responsible citizenship and civic engagement.

Civic Leadership Integrative Seminar (3 hour credit – PAD 3073) This course is the capstone course for the Minor in Civic Engagement. It will engage students, actively, in the San Antonio community through a service-learning experience. (Prerequisite: Foundations of Civic Engagement).

II. Electives 

In addition, students must complete 12 hours of electives. Courses to satisfy the electives requirement are divided into two competencies: Diversity of Communities and Civic Infrastructure. Two courses must come from the courses under the designation of Diversity of Communities competency and two courses must come from the Civic Infrastructure competency.

A. Diversity of Communities (6 Hours

African American Studies (AAS) 

AAS 3013. African American Cultural Experiences 

AAS 3123. Civil Rights Movement & African American Education

American Studies (AMS) 

AMS 3023. Modern American Culture 

AMS 3123. Applications of American Studies 

AMS 3243. Studies in Transnationalism 

AMS 3343. Studies in Race and Ethnicity 

AMS 3443. Studies in Gender and Sexuality

Anthropology (ANT) 

ANT 3223. Anthropology and the Environment 

ANT 3603. Sex, Gender, and Culture 

ANT 3803. Media, Power, and Public Culture 

ANT 3873. Food, Culture, and Society

Bicultural- Bilingual Studies (BBL) 

BBL 3023. Mexican American Culture 

BBL 3033. Mexican Americans in the Southwest

Biology (BIO) 

BIO 3263. The Woody Plants 

BIO 3273. Biology of Flowering Plants 

BIO 3283. Principles of Ecology 

BIO 3333. Plants and Society 

BIO 3553. FAME-Geriatrics

Communication (COM) 

COM 3553. Intercultural Communication

COM 3883. Small Group Communication 

COM 3893. Organizational Communication 

COM 4813. Theory and Practice of Social Interaction

Criminal Justice (CRJ) 

CRJ 3573. Restorative Justice 

CRJ 4403. Race, Ethnicity, and Criminal Justice

Entrepreneurship (ENT) 

ENT 4223. Managing the Entrepreneurial Team

Environmental Science (ES) 

ES 3213. Biology of Flowering Plants

ES 4213. Conservation Biology

ES 4233. Restoration Ecology

Geography (GRG) 

GRG 3153. Geography of Texas 

GRG 3213. Cultural Geography 

GRG 3653. Geographic Perspectives on Women

Health (HTH) 

HTH 3003. Survey of Drug and Health 

HTH 3513. Community Health

History (HIS) 

HIS 3493. History of San Antonio 

HIS 3623. History of the Civil Rights Movement

Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) 

IDS 3013. Diversity, Equity, and the Social Sciences

Management (MGT) 

MGT 3023. Understanding People and Organizations 

MGT 3123. Organizational Communication 

MGT 3253. Interpersonal Communication 

MGT 4213. Designing Organizations

Marketing (MKT) 

MKT 4063. Multicultural Marketing

Mexican American Studies (MAS) 

MAS 3013. Chicana/o Queer Communities, Identities and Theories 

MAS 3033. Mexican Americans in the Southwest 

MAS 3413. Mexican American Family

Political Science (POL) 

POL 3093. Mexican American Politics 

POL 3183. Women in Politics 

POL 3293. Political Movements 

POL 3753. Latino/a Politics

Sociology (SOC) 

SOC 3013. Social Stratification 

SOC 3043. Race and Ethnic Relations 

SOC 3163. Families in Society 

SOC 3253. The Individual and Society

SOC 3263. Latinas in U.S. Society 

SOC 3283. Poverty 

SOC 3293. Sociology of Gender 

SOC 3413. Sociology of the Mexican American Community 

SOC 3433. Mexican Immigration and U.S. Society 

SOC 4433. Culture and Society 

SOC 4683. Health Disparities

Women’s Studies (WS) 

WS 4623. Feminist Theories

B. Civic Infrastructure (6 Hours)

Anthropology (ANT) 

ANT 3733. Political and Legal Anthropology 

ANT 3743. The Anthropology of Cyber Cultures 

ANT 3823. Applied Anthropology

Architecture (ARC) 

ARC 3203. Housing Planning: Design and Development 

ARC 4113. Introduction to Community and Regional Planning and Urban Design 

ARC 4183. Environmental Systems

Bicultural-Bilingual Studies (BBL) 

BBL 3403. Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in a Pluralistic Society

Biology (BIO) 

BIO 4073. Law, Ethics, and the Life Sciences 

BIO 4033. Conservation Biology 

BIO 4053. Wildlife Biology

Civil Engineering (CE) 

CE 4123. Highway Engineering 

CE 4293. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) 

CE 4603. Water Resources Engineering 

CE 4633. Water and Wastewater Treatment

Criminal Justice (CRJ) 

CRJ 3213. Managing Criminal Justice Organizations 

CRJ 3533. Community Corrections 

CRJ 3563. Juvenile Justice

Economics (ECO) 

ECO 3213. Economics of Antitrust and Regulation 

ECO 3253. Economics of Public and Social Issues 

ECO 4273. Environmental and Resource Economics 

ECO 4543. Economics of School System Reform

Entrepreneurship (ENT) 

ENT 4123. Commercialization and Enterprise Planning 

ENT 4623. Tools and Objectives of the Social Enterprise

Environmental Science (ES) 

ES 3053. Environmental Remediation 

ES 3143. Watershed Processes 

ES 3203. Environmental Law 

ES 4003. Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology 

ES 4133. Natural Resource Policy and Administration 

ES 4153. Introduction to Sustainability 

ES 4163. Renewable Energy 

ES 4173. Waste Water Treatment

ES 4183. Environmental Toxicology 

ES 4203. Environmental Assessment

ES 4243. Wildlife Management

Geography (GRG) 

GRG 3314. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems 

GRG 3453. Population Geography 

GRG 3513. Urban Geography 

GRG 3523. Introduction to Urban Planning 

GRG 3533. Geography of Economic Activity 

GRG 3613. Conservation of Resources 

GRG 3623. Geography of Natural Hazards 

GRG 3643. Political Geography 

GRG 3733. Urban and Regional Analysis

Health (HTH) 

HTH 3503. Theories of Health Behavior 

HTH 3523. Worksite Health Promotion 

HTH 3563. Child and Adolescent Health Promotion 

HTH 3663. Program Planning and Evaluation 

HTH 4543. Environmental Health and Safety

History (HIS) 

HIS 3153. Development of American Urban Society

Honors (HON) 

HON 3513. Policy-Making Process 

HON 3523. Beyond Congress and the White House

Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS) 

IDS 3211. Inquiry in Earth Systems Science

Legal Studies (LGS) 

LGS 3113. Minorities and the Law 

LGS 4013. Issues in Law and Society

Military Science (MSC) 

MSC 3013. Leading Small Organizations I 

MSC 3023. Leading Small Organizations II 

MSC 4023. Leadership in a Complex World 

MSC 4033. Practical Leadership

Nonprofit Management (NPO) 

NPO 3003. Fundraising in Nonprofit Agencies 

NPO 3013. Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies

Political Science (POL) 

POL 3253. Participation and American National Elections

POL 3413. The Politics of Urban Development

POL 3553. Social Policy in Modern Welfare States

Public Administration (PAD) 

PAD 3013. Introduction to Public Policy 

PAD 3023. Introduction to Urban Management and Policy 

PAD 3033. Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies 

PAD 3053. Urban Economic Development 

PAD 3113. Managing Public and Nonprofit Administrations 

PAD 3133. Politics and Policies of San Antonio and South Texas 

PAD 3143. Urban and Regional Planning

Sociology (SOC) 

SOC 3083. Social Change and Development 

SOC 3093. Religion and Society 

SOC 3113. Criminology 

SOC 3203. Gerontology 

SOC 3223. Population Dynamics and Demographic Techniques 

SOC 3503. Sociology of Education 

SOC 4053. Health Care Systems

Faculty Openings

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO

DEPARTMENT OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE
UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT SAN ANTONIO
TENURE-TRACK POSITIONS

The Department of Criminal Justice at the University of Texas at San Antonio seeks to fill three tenure-track positions at the Assistant Professor rank beginning Fall 2018.   Area of research specialization is open; however, those with interests in corrections, juvenile justice, quantitative methods and analysis, disparities in the criminal justice system, and/or violence are especially encouraged to apply.  The successful candidate will have a Ph.D. in Criminology, Criminal Justice, or closely related field by the time of appointment, along with demonstrated excellence in scholarly research, effective teaching, commitment to service, and the promise of excellence in grant acquisition.  Teaching and research expectations are commensurate with Research I institutions.

UTSA is a Hispanic-Serving Institution that continues to move toward Research I status and currently enrolls approximately 30,000 students.  The Department is housed within the College of Public Policy on UTSA’s Downtown campus, which is situated in the heart of San Antonio. The Department currently offers a B.A. in Criminal Justice and a M.S. in Criminal Justice and Criminology to a growing population of more than 800 undergraduate and 60 graduate students.  

For further information about the Department, please visit our website:           http://copp.utsa.edu/criminal-justice/home/.

Applicants should submit: (1) a letter describing research and teaching interests, (2) a current curriculum vitae, (3) one to three examples of published scholarly work, and (4) names and contact information of three references whom we may contact.

All materials must be submitted through: https://jobs.utsa.edu

When entering the portal, click on the “Faculty” tab to find the position announcement.

All questions regarding these positions should be directed to:

Richard Hartley, Ph.D.
Chair, Faculty Recruitment Committee
Department of Criminal Justice
Richard.Hartley@utsa.edu
210-458-2759

For questions concerning the submission of materials, please contact:

Cammie Diaz
Administrative Assistant
Department of Criminal Justice, University of Texas at San Antonio
Cammie.diaz@utsa.edu
210-458-2679

Review of applications begins October 1, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled.


The University of Texas at San Antonio is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Women, race/ethnic minorities, veterans, and persons with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants who are selected for interviews must be able to show proof that they will be eligible and qualified to work in the United States by the time of hire.

Faculty Positions

We are currently not recruiting for any faculty positions

MPA Graduate Update:  2016-2017

Our NASPAA accreditation is a sign of quality a student can rely on.  Beyond the rigorous review completed each seven years, the MPA program is continually assessed and students are followed to gain an understanding of their unique view of public service (and their role in it) before and after completing the program.

What follows is an overview of the MPA program itself and of the 2016-2017 graduating class specifically.

Read the MPA Graduate Update; which includes updates on assessment, student demographics, employment after graduation, and student financial support.

University Career Center

The University Career Center is a great source for employment and internship opportunities for UTSA students.  

You can view their website here:  www.hireroadrunners.com

Register with HANDSHAKE for job listings.

Public Administration Events


Master of Public Administration Open House

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

4:30 pm to 6:30 pm

UTSA Downtown Campus, Buena Vista Building, BV 1.338


Visit with faculty, alumni and students to discuss the benefits of and requirements for a Master of Public Administration degree and/or the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership.


                           

Research


Check out our Recent Faculty Publication List


Research Interests

Amy Chanmugam: Interpersonal violence; Child exposure to adult intimate partner violence

Candace Christensen: Violence prevention related to gender and sexuality  

Richard Harris: Social demography; Sexual harassment and assault; Military sociology

Steven Hoffman: Health disparities among at-risk and minority youthInternational adolescent health

Mary Houston-Vega:  Disasters, ethics and malpractice in social work practice and education

Jolyn Mikow: Child welfare abuse and neglect prevention and intervention

Lucinda Nevarez: Health disparities; Health inequalities; Minority health issues

Heidi Adams Rueda: Teen dating violence; Adolescent dating and sexuality; Program evaluation

Martell Teasley: School social work practice; Black studies; Organizational diversity and culture

Undergraduate Minors

Minor in Nonprofit Management

The Minor in Nonprofit Management is open to students in any discipline. The Minor in Nonprofit Management provides the opportunity for students to learn the characteristics of the nonprofit sector, the purpose of the nonprofit sector in American Society, and basic management and fundraising techniques. Students will be provided the opportunity to prepare themselves for leadership positions in social service, youth, environmental, health, arts, senior and other nonprofit organizations.

All students pursuing a Minor in Nonprofit Management must complete the following 18 semester credit hours:

PAD 3003 Fundraising in Nonprofit Agencies

PAD 3033 Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies 

PAD 3113 Managing Nonprofit Organizations

Students must also take 9 semester credit hours from the following list:    

PAD 2073 Foundations of Civic Engagement

PAD 3013  Introduction to Public Policy

PAD 3023 Introduction to Urban Management and Policy

PAD 3043 Public and Nonprofit Financial Management

PAD 3053 Urban Economic Development 

PAD 3073 Civic Leadership Integrative Seminar

PAD 3123 Strategic Planning in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors

PAD 3133 Politics and Policies of San Antonio and South Texas

PAD 3143 Urban and Regional Planning

PAD 3153 Introduction to Public Law

PAD 4843 Study Abroad:  International Public Administration

PAD 4933 Internship in Public Administration (prior approval required)

PAD 4936 Internship in Public Administration (prior approval required)

PAD 4963 Special Topics in Public Administration

Students should not take PAD 4933 or PAD 4936 until they have completed 9 hours in the minor. To declare a Minor in Nonprofit Management, please contact the Downtown Undergraduate Advising Center.

Minor in Public Administration

The Minor in Public Administration is open to students in any discipline.The minor provides undergraduate students with foundational knowledge of the public sector.This includes fundamentals of public leadership and management, the meaning of public service in a diverse society, ethical decision-making, and the practice of policy formation and implementation.All students seeking the Minor in Public Administration must complete 18 semester credit hours.

Required courses:

PAD 1113 Public Administration in American Society 

PAD 2073 Foundations of Civic Engagement

PAD 3013  Introduction to Public Policy

Students must take 9 upper-division semester credit hours from the courses listed below:

PAD 2153 Analysis and Assessment for Public Administration 

PAD 3003 Fundraising in Nonprofit Agencies

PAD 3023 Introduction to Urban Management and Policy

PAD 3033  Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies

PAD 3043  Public and Nonprofit Financial Management

PAD 3053  Urban Economic Development 

PAD 3073 Civic Leadership Integrative Seminar

PAD 3113 Managing Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 3123  Strategic Planning in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors 

PAD 3133 Politics and Policies of San Antonio and South Texas

PAD 3143  Urban and Regional Planning

PAD 3153  Introduction to Public Law 

PAD 4843 Study Abroad:  International Public Administration

PAD 4911 Independent Study (prior approval required)

PAD 4913 Independent Study (prior approval required)

PAD 4933 Internship in Public Administration (prior approval required)

PAD 4936 Internship in Public Administration (prior approval required)

PAD 4963 Special Topics in Public Administration

PAD 4993 Honors Thesis (prior approval required)

To declare a Minor in Public Administration, obtain advice, obtain lists of relevant courses, or seek approval of substitutions for course requirements, student should consult with their academic advisor.

Graduate Certificate Program

Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership

The Department of Public Administration is pleased to announce the addition of a graduate certificate program. The Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership provides essential technical and analytical knowledge for leading and managing nonprofit organizations. With the curriculum offered, students will be able to build and/or improve upon skills crucial to their current and future careers.

The certificate enables graduate students from multiple program areas to develop their expertise, enhance their employment opportunities with nonprofit and public agencies, and meet the growing complexity of demands on the nonprofit sector.

To meet the curricular requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership, students must complete 15 semester credit hours from the following:

Curriculum

Required Courses (9 credit hours):

PAD 5913 Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 5923 Nonprofit Leadership and Management

PAD 5033 Theories of Public Organizations (effective Fall 2015)

Two courses from this list (6 hours):

PAD 5333 Program Evaluation (effective Fall 2107) *

PAD 5343 Human Resource Management in the Public Sector

PAD 5933 Fiscal Resource Development in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 5943 Strategic Planning and Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 5953 Grant Development and Proposal Writing

PAD 5963 Nonprofit Financial Management

PAD 6973 Special Topics (with permission from Advisor)

*A blanket substitution will allow PAD 5333, Program Evaluation to apply as elective hours for students who are within the 2013-2015 and 2015-2017 catalogs.  

Students enrolled in the graduate certificate program are not allowed to substitute courses from other programs. Students are encouraged to plan ahead in order to complete the certificate requirements.

Admissions requirements

For currently enrolled UTSA graduate students*:
Students currently enrolled in a graduate degree program must be in good academic standing. The student should contact the Program Advisor of the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership Program and complete the intent form.

For new students:
Students who are not currently enrolled in a graduate degree program are required to apply for admission to UTSA as a special graduate student and to indicate their intent to seek admission into a certificate program. Applicants will be required to meet University admission requirements for special graduate students.

Prerequisites

If it is determined by the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership Program Advisor that a student requires prerequisite background courses to adequately prepare for the courses included in the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership Program, this will be noted in the student’s file. The student will be notified that the prerequisite courses must be taken before enrolling in Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership Program coursework or within the first semester of coursework.

For specifics on the Certificate Program, contact Dr. Jennifer Alexander, Program Advisor, Jennifer.Alexander@utsa.edu, or (210) 458-2532.

*Please note:  Current UTSA graduate students who complete their degree program before the certificate program must reapply as a special/non-degree student in order to finish required certificate program coursework, per the graduate school.

Teach With Us

FACULTY POSITIONS

UTSA Part-Time Adjunct Lecturers

The Department of Public Administration at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is considering applications for part-time adjunct lecturers to teach in its Master of Public Administration (MPA), Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership (NPAL) and the Bachelor of Public Administration (BPA) degree programs. Adjuncts are paid per course taught. Courses are scheduled up to a year in advance.
At this time, we have specific need for lecturers within nonprofit financial management and accounting, grant writing and fundraising. For more information about our program offerings please visit this link.

Qualifications to Teach at the Master’s Level

The qualifications to be considered as an adjunct lecturer in the MPA program are a doctorate degree
in public administration or related field of study, or a master’s degree with a strong record as a city manager, CEO, CFO, Development Director or other relevant professional management work experience to the course’s specific subject matter. Teaching experience is desirable.

Qualifications to Teach at the Undergraduate Level

The qualifications to be considered as an adjunct lecturer in the BPA program are a master’s degree
in public administration or related field of study. Teaching and/or work experience relevant to the
course’s specific subject matter is desirable.

How to Apply

Those interested in applying should email the Department Chair, Dr. Christopher G. Reddick, at
chris.reddick@utsa.edu. Applicants should attach a cover letter detailing their qualifications along with their interested courses. In addition, candidates should submit a detailed resume.
UTSA is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer. Women, minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants who are selected for interviews must be able to show proof that they will be eligible and qualified to work in the United States by time of hire.


Contact Us

Welcome to the Department of Demography at The University of Texas at San Antonio!

The Department of Demography provides training intended to increase the understanding of the size, distribution, composition and growth of human populations.

Our program focuses on developing an understanding of the conceptual basis of population structure, processes, analytical methods, and related policy issues.

We award a Ph.D in Applied Demography. The focus of the Ph.D. program is on the application of demographic analysis to policy issues encountered in the public and private sectors.

Contact Information

General Inquiries:
Phone: 210-458-3163
Department Email: dem@utsa.edu

Questions about Ph.D in Applied Demography

Dr. Corey Sparks
Email:
corey.sparks@utsa.edu

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Criminal Justice Scholarships

2017-2018 Scholarship applications have closed.

Please return next year to apply for 2018-2019 opportunities. 




Megan Augustyn, Ph.D., CRJ Scholarship Committee Chair
megan.augustyn@utsa.edu (210) 458-2976


Department of Criminal Justice
Durango Building 4.112 (Downtown Campus)
Monday – Friday, 8:00am – 5:00pm
phone: 210-458-2535, fax: 210-458-2680

Student Resources

Current semester information

Syllabi for Current Semester

Spring 2017 Schedule

Spring 2017 Textbooks

Upcoming semester information

Summer 2017 Schedule

Fall 2017 Schedule


Useful Links:

Public Administration Student Organization (PASO)

utsa.paso@gmail.com

Facebook:  PASO


Programs of Study (can be used to track progress in the program; dates refer to catalog year)

MPA POS 2011-2013

MPA POS 2013-2015

MPA POS 2015-2017

MPA POS 2017-2019


Nonprofit Administration and Leadership Certificate Programs of Study

NPAL POS 2013-2015

NPAL POS 2015-2017

NPAL POS 2017-2019

Graduating?  Use the MPA Graduate Degree Checklist to see what pending items you may have. 

For  more information about the MPA program, its requirements and benefits, please review the MPA Student Handbook.

University Links:

Graduate Student Resource: The Quick Guide

2015- 2017 Graduate Catalog

2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog

Office of the Registrar (Scholarships, Student Forms, Registration Information and Graduation Coordination)

Class Schedules

Registering for Classes

Library

Graduate Program

Master of Public Administration

UTSA’s Master of Public Administration (MPA) program prepares students for public service careers and leadership roles in government, public and nonprofit realms. The MPA Faculty works to nurture a student’s commitment to ethical public service in their respective communities. All classes are offered through in-class instruction and held in the city's political, economic and cultural center, on the conveniently-located UTSA Downtown Campus. The Master of Public Administration (MPA) program is fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA).

Our Mission: The MPA program at The University of Texas at San Antonio educates responsible leaders and ethical public servants through a curriculum incorporating original research and practice. The program’s diverse graduates, representing a wide range of professional and community backgrounds, serve the public locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. Bridging research and practice, MPA graduates demonstrate the decision making, management, communication and analytical skills necessary to sustain a responsive and effective public sector.

Program Admission Requirements: Applicants must satisfy University-wide graduate admission requirements, submit a letter of intent, and complete (or have completed) an undergraduate course in U.S. government or politics (3 hours). The 500 word letter of intent should state the applicant’s reasons for pursuing the M.P.A., how their educational and/or career experience has prepared them for the M.P.A. program, and how the degree will help the applicant achieve her or his goals. Two letters of recommendation are required from persons familiar with the applicants academic and/or work abilities (normally, professors and/or work supervisors). Applicants may be admitted as unconditional, conditional, or special graduate students. Admission as a special graduate student does not guarantee subsequent admission as a degree-seeking student; such students must reapply for degree-seeking status.

Degree Requirements: The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the degree, exclusive of coursework or other study required to remove deficiencies, is 40. In addition to these basic degree requirements, students without previous public service employment must complete an additional 6 semester credit hours of PAD 6963,6 Internship. For a complete listing of courses that satisfy degree requirements see the graduate catalog.

Degree candidates must complete the following requirements:

A. 25 semester credit hours of core courses:

PAD 5003  Introduction to Public Service Leadership and Management

PAD 5023 Research Design and Methods

PAD 5033  Theories of Public Organizations

PAD 5233  Applied Research I

PAD 5323  Public Policy Process

PAD 5363  Public Budgeting and Finance

PAD 5393  Economics for Public Affairs

PAD 6001 Leadership and Communication Skills Development Seminar

PAD 6923 Applied Research II

Normally, students enroll in PAD 5003 during their initial semester.

B. 9 semester credit hours of prescribed electives, choose three (3) courses from the following list:

PAD 5243  Management Information Systems

PAD 5303  Ethics in Government Administration

PAD 5313  Public Policy Analysis

PAD 5333  Program Evaluation

PAD 5343  Human Resource Management in the Public Sector

PAD 5443  Diversity Policies and Management

PAD 5913  Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 5923  Nonprofit Leadership and Management

PAD 5943  Strategic Planning & Management for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 6243  Administrative Law

C. 6 semester credit hours of Public Administration electives, chosen in consultation with the student's advisor.

D. Comprehensive examination. Degree candidates are required to pass an oral comprehensive examination. The examination is administered in the form of a presentation to a faculty committee of the exit paper written by the student in the required PAD 6923 Applied Research course.

Undergraduate Program

Bachelor of Public Administration

A Bachelor of Public Administration degree prepares students for employment in the public and non-profit sector, by giving them a broad background in the basics of administration, combined with a contemporary focus on urban management, the non-profit sector, tools of analysis, and the role of ethics.

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the degree, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level.

E-brochure

Core Curriculum Requirements: Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree in Public Administration must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements. If courses are taken to satisfy both degree requirements and the Core Curriculum requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree. For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements see the undergraduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

A. 15 semester credit hours of core Public Administration coursework

PAD 1113 Public Administration in American Society

PAD 2073 Foundations of Civic Engagement

PAD 2153 Analysis/Assessment in Public Administration

PAD 3013 Introduction to Public Policy

PAD 4853 Contemporary Issues in Public Administration (Senior Seminar)

B. 21 semester credit hours selected from the courses listed below:  

PAD 3003 Fundraising in Nonprofit Agencies

PAD 3023 Introduction to Urban Management and Policy

PAD 3033 Introduction to Nonprofit Agencies

PAD 3043 Public and Non-profit Financial Management

PAD 3053 Urban Economic Development 

PAD 3073 Civic Leadership Integrative Seminar

PAD 3113 Managing Non-profit Organizations

PAD 3123 Strategic Planning in the Public and Nonprofit Sectors

PAD 3133 Politics and Policies of San Antonio and South Texas

PAD 3143 Urban and Regional Planning

PAD 3153 Introduction to Public Law

PAD 4911,3 Independent Study (prior approval required)

PAD 4933 Internship in Nonprofit Management (prior approval required)

PAD 4936 Internship in Nonprofit Management (prior approval required)

PAD 4963 Special Topics in Public Administration

PAD 4933 Honors Thesis

C. 18 semester hours of upper-division support work, chosen in consultation with an academic advisor

D. 24 semester hours of free electives (some may need to be upper division in order to meet the 39 hour University requirement)

Check out our very first promotional video for the College of Public Policy.  This video highlights our academic programs and shows how we continue to grow in the heart of San Antonio.

WE NOW OFFER TOURS OF THE DOWNTOWN CAMPUS!

If you're a prospective student click here to schedule a tour.   Bring a guest or family member.   It's that simple.      

Undergraduate Program

Bachelor of Public Administration

A Bachelor of Public Administration degree prepares students for employment in the public and non-profit sector, by giving them a broad background in the basics of administration, combined with a contemporary focus on urban management, the non-profit sector, tools of analysis, and the role of ethics.

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the degree, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level.

Core Curriculum Requirements: Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts degree in Public Administration must fulfill University Core Curriculum requirements. The courses listed in the table below satisfy both degree requirements and Core Curriculum requirements; however, if these courses are taken to satisfy both requirements, then students may need to take additional courses in order to meet the minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree. For a complete listing of courses that satisfy the Core Curriculum requirements see the undergraduate catalog.

Degree Requirements

A. 18 semester credit hours of core Public Administration coursework

PAD 1113 Public Administration in American Society

PAD 2153 Analysis/Assessment in Public Administration

PAD 3013 Introduction to Public Policy

PAD 3023 Introduction to Urban Management and Policy

PAD 3033 Introduction to Non-profit Agencies (cross-listed as NPO 3013)

PAD 4853 Contemporary Issues in Public Administration (Senior Seminar)

B. 21 semester credit hours of prescribed electives, at least 9 of which must be from section I:

Section I:

NPO 3003 Fundraising in Nonprofit Agencies

NPO 4933 Internship in Nonprofit Management (prior approval required)

NPO 4936 Internship in Nonprofit Management (prior approval required)

PAD 3043 Public and Non-profit Financial Management

PAD 3053 Urban Economic Development

PAD 3113 Managing Public and Non-profit Organizations

PAD 3123 Strategic Planning in the Public and Non-profit Sectors

PAD 3133 Politics and Policies of San Antonio and South Texas

PAD 3143 Urban and Regional Planning

PAD 3153, Legal Context of Public Policy & Administration

PAD 4911,3 Independent Study

PAD 4933 Internship in Nonprofit Management (prior approval required)

PAD 4936 Internship in Nonprofit Management (prior approval required)

PAD 4953 Special Topics in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 4963 Special Topics in Nonprofit Organizations

PAD 4963 Special Topics in Public Administration

PAD 4933 Honors Thesis

Section II:

COM 3893 Organizational Communication

CRJ 1113 The American Criminal Justice System

CRJ 3213 Managing Criminal Justice Organizations

CRJ 3623 Substantive Criminal Law

ECO 2003 Economic Principles and Issues

ECO 3273 Introduction to Public Sector Economics

FIN 3003 Survey of Finance

GRG 3314 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

HIS 3153 Development of American Urban Society

IS 3003 Principles of Information Systems for Management

MS 4333 Project Management

SOC 1043, Introduction to Public Health

SOC 3223, Population Dynamics & Demography Techniques

SOC 4053, Health Care System

SOC 4083, Behavioral Epidemiology

SOC 4683, Health Disparities

In addition to the above list, Section II also includes any course listed in the UTSA Minor in Business Administration, or the Minor in Political Science.

C. 15 semester hours of upper-division support work, chosen in consultation with an academic advisor

D. 24 semester hours of free electives (some may need to be upper division in order to meet the 39 hour University requirement)

Contact Us

UTSA DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL WORK

Address: 501 W. Cesar E. Chavez Blvd., San Antonio, TX 78207

Phone: 210.458.3000

Fax: 210.458.3001

Email: swk@utsa.edu


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Undergraduate Internships

CRJ 4933 Undergraduate Internship

Senior class standing and consent of academic advisor and Internship Coordinator. Additional prerequisites may apply to particular internship sites; consult the Department's Internship Coordinator for information.

Supervised experience in an administrative setting that provides the opportunity to integrate theory and practice in criminal justice-related agencies. May be repeated for credit in a subsequent semester when agency setting varies, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor's degree.     


Student Eligibility

The undergraduate internship program (CRJ 4933) is available to students who have taken the required prerequisites from their catalog. The prerequisites for the 2015-16 catalog are:

  • CRJ 1113 - American Criminal Justice System
  • CRJ 2153 – Criminological Theory
  • CRJ 3013 – Research Design and Analysis in Criminal Justice

Background investigations by agencies are routine in virtually all student internships. Keep in mind that the initial screening may range from a brief interview and fingerprinting to a very thorough screening process requiring several months. As a result of the agency internship process time, early coordination with the CJ Internship Coordinator and the selected agency is critical.


Enrollment Procedures

For the semester or term in which the course is taken, students must register in accordance with the registration dates published in the UTSA Registration Calendar. Students may not register late. It is highly recommended that students begin preparing for the internship selection/registration process one (1) semester prior to the term in which the course is actually taken.

Students interested in enrolling in the undergraduate internship program must identify an agency and point-of-contact from the Directory of Internship Placements. Once accepted by the agency, the student must meet with the Internship Coordinator and submit a completed Internship Information Form. During this meeting, course requirements will be explained, documentation completed and a permit to register will be issued to the student.

The following links will assist the student in locating an intern site, as well as the downloading of required documentation for the course.

Getting Started

1. Decide Where to Intern

  • If you don't have an agency in mind, start by thinking about the type of experience you want - law enforcement, probation, courts, private security.
  • Once you have decided the type of agency, think about location - San Antonio, Boerne, Live Oak, etc.
  • If you need suggestions on where to intern or names of people to contact, please examine the Directory of Internship Placements to help you get started.

2. Contact Desired Agency

Set up a meeting for an interview with the Point-of-Contact (POC) for the agency to discuss your request to intern with the organization.

The agency may require a(an):

  • Orientation
  • Oral Interview
  • Background Check
  • Fingerprinting
  • Resume
  • Prerequisite Course

3. Receive Permit to Register

Registration for CRJ 4933 is by permit only. The Internship Coordinator will give you a permit after you have been interviewed by an agency representative.

To get a permit:

  • Once you have been accepted for processing by an agency POC, you and the agency must complete the Internship Information Form.
  • Give the completed Internship Information Form to the Internship Coordinator in person during your pre-registration meeting.
  • The Coordinator will then sign a permit and give you the CRN number that you need to register.
  • Register for CRN 4933 - Take your Permit to Register to your academic advisor. The advisor will process you for admission.

Notes about registering:

  • You register after you have had a pre-registration meeting with the Internship Coordinator. The target is to be officially registered prior to when the semester starts.
  • University deadlines apply. See the semester schedule of classes for spring/summer/fall.

4. Begin Your Internship

You must complete 150 hours with your agency. Training sessions count toward the 150 hours. Driving from home to the agency and meal breaks will not be counted as internship hours. Meet with your agency to establish your schedule; which days of the week you will work and what times.

5. Writing Assignments

There are several required writing assignments for CRJ 4933. Writing assignments are worth a total of 60% of your semester grade. Requirement are listed in the course syllabus.

6. Agency Evaluation

The agency's evaluation is worth 40% of the semester grade.

  • The Internship Coordinator will provide forms for you and your agency supervisor to complete.
  • It is your responsibility to make sure your supervisor receives the Workplace Evaluation Form.

For more information, contact:

Mr. Chris Booker
Internship Coordinator
Durango Building 4.112C
210.458.2624 voice
210.458.2680 fax
christopher.booker@utsa.edu

  

Spring 2017 Office Hours:
Monday/ Wednesday
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Tuesday/Thursday
10:00 am - 11:45 am and 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm 

Friday
10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Student Spotlight

Alpha Phi Sigma New Members 

Officers

Alma Zuniga: President

Alma Zuniga is a senior and Psychology major with a Criminal Justice minor.  She is a first generation student and plans to graduate in December of 2017.  Alma served as Secretary of UTSA's National Criminal Justice Honor Society, Alpha Phi Sigma for the 2015-2016 academic year and currently serves as President for the 2017-2018 academic year.  She plans to earn her master's and doctorate degrees with the goal of becoming a forensic psychologist.  Alma has volunteered her time as community events such as the League of Women Voters, Rock-n-Roll Marathon, Spurs Security Straight Talk, and Alpha Phi Sigma Toy Drive for Family Services.   She has also volunteered with Harlandale High School Special Needs Prom, Caroll Bell Carnival, and Graffiti Wipeout, as well as helping at risk students as a youth mentor at the Presa Community Center.  When she isn't working or studying, Alma can be found spending time with her family, doing outdoor activities, collecting superhero memorabilia, reading books, writing poetry, or watching crime shows.   

Valeria Sandoval: Vice President

Valeria Sandoval currently serves as the Vice President of Alpha Phi Sigma.  She is a junior pursuing a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice.  She is on track to graduating in May of 2018 and plans on enrolling in the Master's of Criminal Justice & Criminology program after graduating.  Valeria was born in El Paso, Texas and moved to San Antonio from Colorado Springs, Colorado.  She currently works part time as an Administrative Associate for the UTSA Department of Chemistry.  Her love for children and passion for swimming has led her to volunteer with "Kinetic Kids" at the local Love to Swim School.  There, she aids children with special needs with recreational swimming and provide unique experiences through physical and creative activities in a supportive environment.  Outside of school, work, and volunteering, Valeria loves spending time with family, sports, traveling, being outdoors and going on adventures.

Nohelia Villeda: Treasurer/Secretary

Nohelia is a junior at the University of Texas at San Antonio pursuing a double major in Criminal Justice and Public Administration and a double minor in Non-Profit Management and Mathematics.  She has been involved in various non-profit organizations such as the SA Food Bank, Haven for Hope, and Any Baby Can.  She believes Alpha Phi Sigma will provide additional opportunities to give back to the community and UTSA as well as build a stronger relationship with other Criminal Justice professors and students.   Along with her involvement in Alpha Phi Sigma, Nohelia also serves on the College of Public Policy Student Cabinet. She hopes to pursue a career with FBI after she graduates from UTSA.

Spotlight

James Rocha:  Alpha Phi Sigma's Member of the Month, September 2017

James is a Criminal Justice major with a minor in Public Administration. He will be attending law school in the fall of 2018. His focus of law will be criminal defense and real estate. He would like to be a voice for people who do not have money to pay for proper representation. He is born and raised on the westside of San Antonio, where Las Palmas area and Emma Frey Elementary are his stomping grounds. Volunteering brings him joy, balance and helps him feel closer to his community. After Law school, he plans on continuing his volunteer work while offering his services to inner city youth. He plans to keep grounded to Las Palmas Community politics and policies. He would like to help youth understand the changes going on around them and how important it is to vote. 


Joshua Barrera

Joshua Barrera is graduating in the spring of 2018 with a double major in Criminal Justice and Sociology.  From a small town in south Texas, he has studies in Colorado and in Granada, Spain.  He wishes to attend graduate school then pursue employment with the Federal Bureau of Investigations.

Past Members and Alumni

Alejandra Cortes

Alejandra Cortes served as President of Alpha Phi Sigma during the 2015-2016 academic year and previously served as Vice-President for the 2014-2015 academic year.  Alejandra is a senior majoring in Political Science accompanied with a minor in Criminal Justice and Legal Studies.  She earned a full scholarship to UTSA and plans to graduate in the Spring of 2017 with magna cum laude honors.  he was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, and has resided in San Antonio since age 5. She currently works at Prins Law Firm as a legal assistant. Prins Law Firm handles Real Estate Law, Asset Protection, Business Litigation, and other complex litigation.  Alejandra has volunteered her time at community service events such as UTSA National Night Out, Special Olympics, San Antonio Housing Authority’s Paint-a-Thon, San Antonio Police Department’s Explorers program and SAPD’s Active Shooter Program.  She has also volunteered with Faith Church, Child Safe, Selena Bidi Bidi Fun Run, Alpha Phi Sigma and UTSA Police Department Toy Drive for Family Violence Prevention Services, and Food Drives with the San Antonio Food Bank. She aspires to get accepted to either University of Texas School of Law, University of Miami School of Law, or University of California Los Angeles School of Law. She is interested in becoming a prosecutor, or practicing either immigration law or entertainment law. When she is not busy with work, classes and Alpha Phi Sigma, she enjoys working out, doing outdoor activities, going to the shooting range, spending time with her dog and watching crime shows.  

Nishita Maliek

Nishita Maliek has dual undergraduate degrees in Criminal Justice & Psychology, and a Master's in Criminal Justice & Criminology.  She hopes to work as a correctional officer, eventually leading her way to help reform and rehabilitate individuals who have been released from prison and are trying to improve their lives, and feels Alpha Phi Sigma is a stepping stone to get there.  Nishita has participated in many programs like I-Mentors, Camp Mosaic, Habitat for Humanity, and the Raul Jimenez Thanksgiving for the underprivileged.  Outside of school Nishita loves to read books, play the piano, do yoga, and enjoys spending time with her family.



Trevin King

After his May 10th graduation, Trevin now lives in Dallas and works for a great company, Diligence International Group, as an Investigative Specialist. Thanks to the knowledge and connections available to him through UTSA Criminal Justice Department, Trevin has been given the opportunity for an exciting career and a promising future. While at UTSA, Trevin served as President of the Alpha Phi Sigma Honor Society and was active in its many projects. 

Allison Fernandez

Allison graduated from San Antonio College with an Associate's of Arts in Criminal Justice and an Associate's of Applied Science in Paralegal Studies. She is a graduate of UTSA, completing her B.A. in Criminal Justice magna cum laude in the Fall of 2013. Allison is currently a new graduate student in the Master's of Justice Policy program and hopes to enter a doctoral program upon completion of her master's degree. She currently works at a securities law firm as the office coordinator and legal assistant, helping represent Texas investors who have suffered financial losses due to the mishandling of accounts by their stockbroker or brokerage firm. The firm she works for also handles business matters and probate proceedings. She is also a graduate research assistant for Dr. Jeffrey T. Ward. When she is not busy with work or classes, she enjoys running and spending time with her husband, Mark, and two Jack Russell terriers, Slash and Velvet. 

Yolanda Baez

Yolanda graduated August 2014 and now holds a position with the Department of Family and Protective Services as an Adult Protective Services Specialist. The mission of the DFPS is to provide services and to help individuals who are abused, neglected, or face exploitation. Her job focuses on helping one of the most vulnerable and fastest growing populations in the state of Texas--the elderly. Not only does DFPS provide any necessary resources such as enrolling clients in Medicare, paying the utilities that they can no longer afford, and providing them with groceries so that they will be able to obtain the necessary nutrition in their diets, but DFPS also provides them with a safe haven. Many times they are faced with a client who has been abused or neglected either by their caretakers or themselves and have many medical issues, whether it is a curable disease or a life-threatening one, and it is their duty to provide them with the right medications or the proper medical attention. The cases that they are confronted with are not easy to handle but the job has to be done and Yolanda has learned that it is important to have a sense of love and devotion for your job and clients. She is glad that she chose a career in this field because there is never a dull moment and the rewards of seeing a client happy and healthy outweigh the difficult situations that they have faced and, with help, have overcome.

Whitney Little-Jordan

Whitney graduated from Northwest Vista College with an Associate's of Arts in Liberal Arts. She completed her Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice in May of 2015.  Whitney is currently enrolled in the Criminal Justice & Criminology Master's program with UTSA and served as the former president of Alpha Phi Sigma during the 2014-2015 academic year.  Whitney has logged many volunteer hours throughout the San Antonio area. Her hard work has benefited several programs such as Graffiti Abatement, Meals on Wheels, and Habitat for Humanity.  Whitney also traveled with the UTSA Criminal Justice department to do a comparative study of Spain’s criminal justice system during the study abroad experience.  While traveling throughout the country she absorbed the Spanish culture and made several life-long friends.  Whitney is currently working at Diesel Barbershop, but when she is not busy working or in class, she enjoys shopping and spending time with her friends, and rescue cat Bevo.

Events

Upcoming Events


News/Announcements

  • Congrats to Marcos Mendoza, graduate students in the Master of Science in Criminal Justice & Criminology program, who was accepted into the AmeriCorps VISTA program through the Alamo Area Council of Governments.  He will work as a paid economic development intern for one year implementing an economic development plan for Frio and Medina counties in Texas.  The goal of the VISTA is to build capacity in rural low-income communities.  Full Story: UTSA Today, posted 10-17-17
  • The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities National Internship Program Info Session is tomorrow from 6pm - 8 pm in the Denman Ballroom at UTSA 1604 campus.  Learn all about paid federal and corporate sector opportunities.  Register on Handshake.






Recent Faculty Publications

2017

Augustyn, M. B., & Jackson, D. B. (2017). An intersectional look at the rush to “Adulthood”: Considering the role of gender, race and SES in the link between precocious transitions and adult antisocial behavior. Youth & Society.

Augustyn, M. B., & Loughran, T. (2017). Juvenile waiver as a mechanism of social stratification: A focus on human capital. Criminology, 55, 405-437.

Augustyn, M. B., Ward, J. T. & Krohn, M. D. (2017). Exploring intergenerational continuity in gang membership. Journal of Crime and Justice, 40, 252-274.

Henry, K. L., & Augustyn, M. B. (2017). Intergenerational continuity in cannabis use: The role of parent’s early onset and lifetime disorder on child’s early onset. Journal of Adolescent Health, 60, 87-92.

Hoskin, A. W., Hartley, R. D., Ellis, L., & McMurray, H. (2017). Does religiosity explain cross-national differences in crime? The case of the United States versus Malaysian university students. Journal of Religion & Society, 19, 1-17.

Jackson, D. (2017). The interplay between early father involvement and neonatal medical risk in the prediction of infant neurodevelopment. Prevention Science, 18, 106-115.

Jackson, D. (2017). The interplay between early language and temperamental difficulties in the prediction of severe antisocial behavior among males. Journal of Criminal Psychology, 7, 70-80.

Jackson, D., & Vaughn, M. G. (2017). Parental history of disruptive life events and household food insecurity. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 49, 554-560.

Jackson, D., & Johnson, K. R. (2017). Does breastfeeding reduce offspring junk food consumption during childhood? Examinations by SES and race/ethnicity. Public Health Nutrition, 20, 1441-1451.

Jackson, D., & Vaughn, M. G. (2017). Parental incarceration and child sleep and eating behaviors. Journal of Pediatrics, 185, 211-217.

Jackson, D., Vaughn, M. G., & Salas-Wright, C. (2017). Poor nutrition and bullying behaviors: A comparison of deviant and non-deviant youth. Journal of Adolescence, 57, 69-73.

Jackson, D., & Vaughn, M. G. (2017). Household food insecurity during childhood and adolescent misconduct. Preventive Medicine, 96, 113-117.

Kelsay, J., Tillyer, M., Ward, J., & Tillyer, R. (2017). The violent victimization of children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly: Situational characteristics and victim injury. Violence & Victims, 32, 342-361

Lynch, K. R., Jewell, J.A., Golding, J. M., & Kembel, H.B. (2017). Associations between relationship sexual behavior norm beliefs and intimate partner rape judgments: A structural equation model. Violence Against Women, 23, 426-451.

Moon, B., & Morash, M. (2017). A test of general strain theory in South Korea: A focus on objective/subjective strains, negative emotions, and composite conditioning factors. Crime & Delinquency, 63, 731-756.

Moon, B., & Morash, M. (2017). Gender and general strain theory: A comparison of strains, mediating, and moderating effects explaining three types of delinquency. Youth & Society, 49, 484 – 504.

Richards, T. N., Tillyer, M. S., & Wright, E. M. (2017). Child maltreatment type and IPV victimization, perpetration, and victimization/perpetration. Child Abuse & Neglect, 67, 240-248.

Tillyer, M. S., Wilcox, P., & Fissel, E. (2017). Violence in schools: Repeat victimization, low self-control, and the mitigating influence of collective efficacy. Journal of Quantitative Criminology.

Walter, R. J., Viglione, J., & Tillyer, M. S. (2017). One strike to second chances: Using criminal backgrounds in admission decisions for assisted housing. Housing Policy Debate, 27, 734-750.

Wasarhaley, N. E., Lynch, K.R., Golding, J.M., & Renzetti, C. M. (2017). The impact of gender stereotypes on courtroom perceptions of lesbian intimate partner violence. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 32, 635–658.

Wright, E. M., & Tillyer, M. S. (2017). Neighborhood social ties, collective efficacy, and intimate partner violence against women. Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

2016

Augustyn, M. B. (2016). Updating perceptions of (in)justice. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 53, 255-286.

Augustyn, M. B., & Ray, J. V. (2016). Psychopathy and perceptions of procedural justice. Journal of Criminal Justice, 46, 170-183.

Enriquez, R., & Sullivan, M. J. (2016). The impact of interior immigration enforcement on mixed-citizenship families. Boston College Journal of Law and Social Justice.

Golding, J. M., Lynch, K. R., & Wasarhaley, N. E. (2016). Impeaching rape victims in criminal court: Does concurrent civil action hurt justice? Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 31, 3129-3149.

Hartley, R. D., & Baldwin, J. M. (2016). Waging war on recidivism among justice-involved veterans: An impact evaluation of a large urban veterans treatment court. Criminal Justice Policy Review.

Jackson, D., & Beaver, K. M. (2016). Do birth complications predict motor deficits in children? The moderating role of genetic and maternal factors. Perspectives on Early Childhood Psychology and Education, 1, 171-198.

Jackson, D., Newsome, J., & Beaver, K. M. (2016). Does early paternal involvement predict offspring developmental diagnoses? Early Human Development, 103, 9-16.

Jackson, D., & Beaver, K. M. (2016). The interplay between neuropsychological deficits and adverse parenting in the prediction of adolescent misconduct: A partial test of the generalizability of Moffitt’s Theory. Criminal Justice & Behavior, 43, 1505-1521.

Jackson, D., & Newsome, J. (2016). The link between infant neuropsychological risk and childhood antisocial behavior among males: The moderating role of neonatal health risk. Journal of Criminal Justice, 47, 32-40.

Jackson, D. (2016). Breastfeeding duration and offspring conduct problems: The moderating role of genetic risk. Social Science & Medicine, 166, 128-136.

Jackson, D. (2016). The association between breastfeeding duration and attachment: A genetically informed analysis. Breastfeeding Medicine, 11, 297-304.

Jackson, D., & Beaver, K. M. (2016). The association between breastfeeding exposure and duration, neuropsychological deficits, and psychopathic personality traits in offspring: The moderating role of 5HTTLPR. Psychiatric Quarterly, 87, 107-127.

Jackson, D. (2016). The link between poor quality nutrition and childhood antisocial behavior: A genetically informative analysis. Journal of Criminal Justice, 44, 13-20.

Jackson, D., & Beaver, K. M. (2016). Evidence of a gene x environment interaction between birth weight and genetic risk in the prediction of criminogenic outcomes among adolescent males. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 60, 99-120.

Kleck, G., & Jackson, D. (2016). What kind of joblessness affects crime? A national case-control study of serious property crime. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 32, 489-513.

Lynch, K. R., Jewell, J.A., Golding, J. M., & Kembel, H.B. (2016). Associations between relationship sexual behavior norm beliefs and intimate partner rape judgments: A structural equation model. Violence Against Women. Advance online publication.

Mitchell, S., Willet, J., Monico, L.B., James, A., Rudes, D.S., Viglione, J., Schwartz, R.P., Gordon, M.S., & Friedmann, P.D. (2016). Community correctional agents’ views of medication assisted treatment: Examining their influence on treatment referrals and community supervision practices. Substance Abuse, 37, 127-133.

Moon, B., Morash, M., Jeong, S., & Youn, H. (2016). Gender differences in the routine activities associated with risks for larceny in South Korea. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 60, 1327-1343.

Moon. B., Morash, M., Jeong, S., & Youn, H. (2016). Routine activity theory and criminal victimization: Examples of Korea. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology, 60, 1327-1343.

Moon, B., & McCluskey, J. (2016). School-based victimization of teachers in Korea: Focusing on individual and school characteristics. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 31, 1340-1361.

Newsome, J., Vaske, J. C., Gehring, K. S., & Boisvert, D. L. (2016). Sex differences in sources of resilience and vulnerability to risk for delinquency. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 730-745.

Nobles, M., Ward, J., & Tillyer, R. (2016). The impact of neighborhood context on spatiotemporal patterns of burglary. Journal of Research in Crime & Delinquency, 53, 711-740.

Thornberry, T. P., Krohn, M. D., Augustyn, M. B., Greenman, S., & Buchanon, M. (2016). The impact of adolescent risk behavior on partner relationships. Advances in Life Course Research, 28, 6-21.

Tillyer, R., & Hartley, R. (2016). The use and impact of fast-track departures: Exploring prosecutorial and judicial discretion in Federal immigration cases. Crime & Delinquency, 62, 1624-1647.

Tillyer, M. S., & Tillyer, R. (2016). Race, ethnicity, and adolescent violent victimization. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 1497-1511.

Tillyer, M. S., Gialopsos, B., & Wilcox, P. (2016). The short-term repeat sexual victimization of adolescents in school. Crime and Delinquency, 62, 81-106.

Walter, R. J., Caudy, M., & Ray, J. V. (2016). Revived and discouraged: Evaluating employment barriers for Section 3 residents with criminal records. Housing Policy Debate, 26, 398-415.

Ward, J., Hartley, R. D., & Tillyer, R. (2016). Unpacking gender and race/ethnicity biases in the federal sentencing of drug offenders: A causal mediation approach. Journal of Criminal Justice.


2015
Augustyn, M. B. (2015). The (Ir)relevance of procedural justice in the pathways to crime. Law and Human Behavior, 39, 388-401.

Augustyn, M. B. (2015). Updating perceptions of (in)justice. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency.

Augustyn, M. B., & Ward, J. T. (2015). Exploring the sanction– crime relationship through a lens of procedural justice. Journal of Criminal Justice, 43, 470-479.

Beaver, K. M., Jackson, D. B., & Flesher, D. (2015). The potential use of genetics to increase the effectiveness of treatment programs for criminal offenders. Recent Advances in DNA and Gene Sequences, 9.

Caudy, M., Folk, J., Stuewig, J., Wooditch, A., Martinez, A., Maass, S., Tangney, J., & Taxman, F. S. (2015). Does substance misuse moderate the relationship between criminal thinking and recidivism? Journal of Criminal Justice, 43, 12-19

Childs, K., & Ray, J.V. (2015). Race differences in patterns of risky behavior and associated risk factors. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology.

Frick, P.J., & Ray, J.V. (2015). Evaluating callous-unemotional traits as a personality construct. Journal of Personality, 83, 710 – 722.

Golding, J.M., Wasarhaley, N.E., Lynch, K.R., Lippert, A. & Magayrics, C.L. (2015). Improving the credibility of adolescents in child sexual assault trials: The impact of a sexual assault nurse examiner. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 33, 493-507.

Golding, J. M., Lynch, K. R., & Wasarhaley, N. E. (2015). Impeaching rape victims in criminal court: Does concurrent civil action hurt justice? Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advance online publication.

Golding, J. M., Lynch, K. R., Wasarhaley, N. E., & Keller, P. (2015). Courtroom perceptions of child sexual assault: The impact of an eyewitness. Criminal Justice & Behavior, 42, 763-781.

Jackson, D. B., & Beaver, K. M. (2015). Sibling differences in low birth weight, dopaminergic polymorphisms, and ADHD symptomology: Evidence of GxE. Psychiatry Research, 226, 467-473.

Jackson, D. B., & Beaver, K. M. (2015). Sibling differences in low birth weight, dopaminergic polymorphisms, and ADHD symptomology: Evidence of GxE. Psychiatry Research.

Jackson, D. B., & Beaver, K. M. (2015). A shared pathway of antisocial risk: A path model of parent and child effects. Journal of Criminal Justice, 43, 154-163.

Jackson, D. B., & Beaver, K. M. (2015). The role of adolescent nutrition and physical activity in the prediction of verbal intelligence during early adulthood: A genetically informed analysis of twin pairs. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12, 385-401.

Jackson, D. B., & Beaver, K. M. (2015). The influence of nutritional factors on verbal deficits and psychopathic personality traits: Evidence of the moderating role of MAOA genotype. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 12, 15739-15755.

Klahm, C.F., & Tillyer, R. (2015). Rethinking the measurement of officer experience and its role in traffic stop searches. Police Quarterly, 18, 343-367.

Lynch, K.R. & Logan, T. (2015). Risk factors in arrest of rural and urban female victims of intimate partner violence. Violence and Victims, 30, 488-501.

Lynch, K.R. & Logan, T. (2015). Police officers’ attitudes and challenges with charging stalking. Violence and Victims. Advance online publication.

Lynch, K.R., & Logan, T. (2015). You better say your prayers and get ready: Guns within the context of intimate partner abuse. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advance online publication.

Magyarics, C. L., Lynch, K.R., Golding, J. M., & Lippert, A. (2015). The impact of frequency of behavior and type of contact on judgments involving a criminal stalking case. Law and Human Behavior. Advance online publication.

McCluskey, J., Moon, B., & Lee, S. (2015). Korean police officer attitudes and self-reported behaviors. Journal of Asian Criminology,10, 7-22.

Mitchell, O. & Caudy, M. (2015). Race differences in drug offending and drug distribution arrests. Crime & Delinquency, 1-22.

Mitchell, O., & Caudy, M. (2015). Examining racial disparities in drug arrests. Justice Quarterly, 32, 288-313.

Moon, B., & Alarid, L. (2015). Low self-control theory and school bullying. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 30, 839-856.

Moon, B., Morash, M., Jang, J. O., & Jeong, S. (2015). Violence against teachers in South Korea: Negative consequences and factors leading to emotional distress. Violence and Victims, 30, 279-292.

Pechorro, P., Ray, J.V., Raine, A.Maroco, J., & Goncalves, R.A. (2015). The reactive proactive aggression questionnaire: Validation among a Portuguese sample of incarcerated juvenile delinquents.Journal of Interpersonal Violence.

Pechorro, P., Ray, J.V., Maroco, J., & Goncalves, R.A. (2015). Adaptation of the basic empathy scale among a Portuguese sample of detained juvenile offenders.Psychology, Crime, and Law.

Pechorro, P., Ray, J.V., Barroso, R., Maroco, J., & Goncalves, R.A. (2015). Validation of the ICU among a Portuguese sample of detained juvenile offenders.International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology.

Pechorro, P., Maroco, J., Ray, J.V., & Goncalves, R.A. (2015). Psychometric properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) among a Portuguese sample of incarcerated juvenile offenders. Psychology, Crime & Law, 21, 854 – 870.

Pechorro, P., Andershed, H., Ray, J.V., Maroco, J., & Goncalves, R.A. (2015).Validation of the youth psychopathic traits inventory and youth psychopathic traits inventory - Short version among incarcerated juvenile delinquents. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 37, 576 – 586.

Ray, J.V., Thornton, L.C., Frick, P.J., Steinberg, L., & Cauffman, E. (2015). Impulse control and callous-unemotional traits distinguish patterns of delinquency and substance use in justice involved adolescents: Examining the moderating role of neighborhood context. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 44, 599 – 611.

Ray, J.V., Frick, P.J., Thornton, L.C., Steinberg, L., & Cauffman, E. (2015). Positive and negative item wording and its influence on the assessment of callous-unemotional traits. Psychological Assessment.

Renzetti, C.M., Lynch, K.R., & DeWall, C.N. (2015). Ambivalent sexism, frequency of alcohol use, and IPV perpetration. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advanced online publication.

Sullivan, C. J., & Newsome, J. (2015). Psychosocial and genetic risk markers for longitudinal trends in delinquency: An empirical assessment and practical discussion. Criminal Justice Studies, 28, 61-83.

Sullivan, M. J., & Enriquez, R. (2015). The impact of interior immigration enforcement on mixed-citizenship families. Journal of Law and Social Justice, 36.

Taxman, F. S., & Caudy, M. (2015). Risk tells us who, but not what or how: Empirical assessment of the complexity of criminogenic needs to inform correctional programming. Criminology & Public Policy, 14, 71-103.

Thornton, L.C., Frick, P.J., Schulman, E., Ray, J.V., Steinberg, L., Cauffman, E. (2015). Callous-unemotional traits and adolescents’ role in group crime. Law & Human Behavior, 39, 368-377.

Tillyer, M. S. (2015). General multilevel opportunity theory: New extensions and applications for situational prevention. Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, 31, 107-121.

Tillyer, M. S. (2015). The relationship between childhood maltreatment and adolescent violent victimization. Crime & Delinquency, 61, 973-995.

Tillyer, M. S., Tillyer, R., & Kelsay, J. (2015). The nature and influence of the victim-offender relationship in kidnapping incidents. Journal of Criminal Justice, 43, 377-385.

Tillyer, M. S. (2015). Victimization, offending, and perceived risk for early violent death. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 42, 529-545.

Tillyer, R., Hartley, R.D., & Ward, J. (2015). Differential treatment of female defendants: Does criminal history moderate the effect of gender on sentence length in federal narcotics cases? Criminal Justice & Behavior, 42, 703-721.

Tillyer, R., & Klahm, C.F. (2015). Discretionary searches, the impact of passengers, and the implications for police- minority encounters. Criminal Justice Review, 40, 378-396.

Tillyer, M. S., & Tillyer, R. (2015). Maybe I should do this alone:A comparison of co-offending and solo robbery outcomes.Justice Quarterly, 32, 1064-1088.

Thornberry, T. P., Krohn, M. D., Augustyn, M. B., Buchanan, M., & Greenman, S. J. (2015). The impact of adolescent risk behavior on partner relationships. Advances in Life Course Research.

Vaske, J. C., Newsome, J., Boisvert, D., Piquero, A. R., Paradis, A. D., & Buka, S. L. (2015). The impact of low birth weight and maternal age on adulthood offending. Journal of Criminal Justice, 43, 49-56.

Viglione, J., Rudes, D.S., & Taxman, F.S. (2015). Misalignment in supervision: Implementing risk/needs assessment instruments in probation. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 42, 263-28.

Viglione, J., Rudes, D.S., & Taxman, F.S. (2015). Achieving correctional change: The warrants of understanding organizational goals & occupational roles. European Journal of Probation, 7, 103-123.

Ward, J., Fox, K., Tillyer, M.S., & Lane, J. (2015). Gender, low self-control, and violent victimization. Deviant Behavior, 36, 113-129.

Wasarhaley, N. E., Lynch, K.R., Golding, J.M., & Renzetti, C. M. (2015). The impact of gender stereotypes on courtroom perceptions of lesbian intimate partner violence. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Advance online publication.

2014 

Augustyn, M.B., Thornberry, T., & Krohn, M.D. (2014). Gang membership and the pathways to maladaptive parenting. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 24, 252-267.

Bechelli, M. J., Caudy, M., Gardner, T. M., Huber, A., Mancuso, D., Samuels, P., Shah, T., & Venters, H. D. (2014). Case studies from three states: Breaking down silos between health care and criminal justice. Health Affairs, 33, 474-481. 

Boisvert, D., Boutwell, B., Vaske, J., & Newsome, J. (2014). Genetic overlap between delinquent peer association and delinquency in adolescence. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 41, 58-74.

Boman, J.H., & Ward, J.T. (2014). Beyond projection: Specifying the types of peer delinquency misperception at the item- and scale-levels. Deviant Behavior, 35, 555-580. 

Caudy, M., Tang, L., Wooditch, A., & Taxman, F. S. (2014). Short-term trajectories of substance use in a sample of drug-involved probationers. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 46, 202-213 

 Ellis, L., Anthony, H., Hartley, R. D., Walsh, A., Widmayer, A., & Ratnasingam, M. (2014). General theory vs. ENA theory: Comparing their predictive accuracy and scope. International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology

Frick, P. J., Ray, J. V., Thornton, L. C., & Kahn, R. E. (2014). Annual research review: A developmental psychopathology approach to understanding callous-unemotional traits in children and adolescents with serious conduct problems. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 55, 532-548.

Frick, P.J., Ray, J.V., Thornton, L.C., & Kahn. R.E. (2014). The road forward for research on callous-unemotional traits – A reply to Lahey (2013). Psychological Bulletin, 1, 64-68.

Frick, P. J., Ray, J. V., Thornton, L. C., & Kahn, R. E. (2014). Can callous-unemotional traits enhance the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of serious conduct problems in children and adolescents? A comprehensive review. Psychological Bulletin, 1, 1- 57.

Frick, P.J., Ray, J.V., Thornton, L.C., & Kahn, R.E. (2014). Would a Specifier for Callous-Unemotional Traits Enhance the Diagnosis of Conduct Disorder? A Comprehensive Review. Psychological Bulletin, 1, 1-57.

Gilbert, M.J. (2014, In Press). Shaping justice for the twenty-first century in the U.S.A.: The national association of community and restorative justice. Restorative Justice, 2, 205-217.

McCluskey, J., Cancino, J., Tillyer, M.S., Tillyer, R. (2014). Does organizational structure matter? Investigation centralization, case clearances, and robbery. Police Quarterly, 17, 250-275.

Moon, B., & Jang, S.J. (2014). A general strain approach to psychological and physical bullying: A study of interpersonal aggression at school. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29, 2147-2171.

Moon, B., McCluskey J., Blurton D., & Hwang H.W. (2014). Sources of low self-control: influences of parental and teachers’ practices - evidence from Korea. Youth Violence & Juvenile Justice, 12, 167-187.

Newsome, J., & Sullivan, C. J. (2014). Resilience and vulnerability in adolescents: Genetic influences on differential response to risk for delinquency. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 43, 1080-1095.

Newsome, J., Boisvert, D., & Wright, J.P. (2014). Genetic and environmental influences on the co-occurrence of early academic achievement and externalizing behavior. Journal of Criminal Justice, 42, 45-53.

Ray, J. V., Kimonis, E. R., & Seto, M. (2014). Correlates and moderators of child pornography consumption in a community sample. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 26, 523-545. 

Rudes, D.S., Viglione, J., Lerch, J., Porter, C., & Taxman, F.S. (2014). Build to sustain: collaborative partnerships between university researchers and criminal justice practitioners. Criminal Justice Studies, 27, 249-263. 

Tapia, M., Sparks, C., & Miller, J.M. (2014).Texas Latino prison gangs: An exploration of generational shift and rebellion. The Prison Journal, 94, 159-179. 

Taxman, F. S., Pattavina, A., & Caudy, M. (2014). Justice reinvestment in the United States: An empirical assessment of the potential impact of increased correctional programming on recidivism. Victims & Offenders, 9, 50-75. 

Thornberry, T.P., Matsuda, M., Greenman, S., Augustyn, M.B., Henry, K.L., Smith, C.A., & Ireland, T.O. (2014). Adolescent risk factors for child maltreatment. Child Abuse and Neglect, 38, 706-722. 

Tillyer, M.S. (2014). Violent victimization across the life course: Moving a victim careers agenda forward. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 41, 594-613. 

Tillyer, M.S., & Tillyer, R. (2014). Violence in context: A multilevel analysis of victim injury in robbery incidents. Justice Quarterly, 31, 767-791. 

Tillyer, M.S., & Wright, E.M. (2014). Intimate partner violence and the victim-offender overlap. Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency, 51, 29-55. 

Tillyer, R. (2014). Opening the black box of officer decision-making: An examination of race, criminal history, and discretionary searches. Justice Quarterly, 31, 961-985.

Tillyer, R., Tillyer, M.S., McCluskey, J., Cancino, J., McKinnon, L., Todaro, J. (2014). Researcher-practitioner partnerships and crime analysis: A case study in action research. Police Practice and Research: An International Journal, 15, 404-418.

Ward, J.T., Krohn, M.D., & Gibson, C.L. (2014). The effects of police contact on developmental trajectories of violence: A group-based, propensity score matching analysis. Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 29, 440-475.

Ward, J.T., Nobles, M.R., Youstin, T.J., & Cook, C.L. (2014). Placing the neighborhood accessibility-burglary link in social-structural context. Crime & Delinquency, 60, 739-763.


Criminal Justice Summer Camp

CRIMINAL JUSTICE SUMMER CAMP FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS
Dates: TBA
9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Rudy Rueda talks about what he liked the most about the Criminal Justice Summer Camp.

Katiana wants to go into law enforcement.  Check out her story:

ABOUT

The UTSA Criminal Justice Summer Camp offers rising high school juniors and seniors a week-long, hands-on learning experience to discover what it's like to be a criminal justice professional.  


BENEFITS

  • Campers learn how to become detectives for a day by investigating a mock crime scene or examining fingerprints.  
  • Unlike any other criminal justice summer program, our campers have the opportunity to tour the FBI facility, which is closed to the general public.
  • College of Public Policy faculty with years of experience in their chosen field, instruct students on topics of the criminal justice process, criminal law, and crime scene investigation.  
  • During the camp, students will learn a basic understanding of crime and justice and the roles of the police, courts, and corrections.
  • The last day's session focuses on restorative justice, a system of the criminal justice system that centers on the rehabilitation of offenders through reconciliation with the victims and the community.  Students will be introduced to restorative justice practices that are being implemented across the country. These practices have become tools to dealing with bullying in schools and conflict resolution.

CAMP DETAILS & ELIGIBILITY

  • Eligible students:  Rising high school juniors or seniors (entering a junior or senior status in the fall.)  Participants must be 16-18 years of age at the time of designated camp session.
  • Camp runs from Mon. - Fri., 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 
  • This is a day camp only.  No overnight accommodations are available on campus.  

  • DEADLINE:  Register by Friday, May 12, 2017, 11:59 PM CST

  • CLICK HERE TO VIEW THE CAMP ITINERARY

FEES

  • Camp fee for the week is $250.00.  Fee includes lunch and a T-shirt.

APPLICATION IS CLOSED


Instructions to submit paperwork:

  • Download application
  • Save a copy as PDF to your computer first.  Go to "Save As"
  • Open document from your computer and complete form in its entirety.  
  • After filling out form, save as PDF.  Print document and attain all signatures
  • Scan/Email completed application to rhonda.johnson@utsa.edu


CONTACT  

For questions or concerns, contact the Camp Coordinator Robert Rico, robert.rico@utsa.edu or call (210) 458-2535
You can also email Rhonda Johnson,  rhonda.johnson@utsa.edu

SPACE IS LIMITED

                                                                   

IN THE NEWS
'Crime scene' helps students uncover career aspirations San Antonio Express-News, July 16, 2014                                                                                                                                                                                                   

Here are some things our participants and parents had to say about the UTSA Criminal Justice Summer Camp:


"The camp taught us what it's really like to be a police officer.  A lot of their work involves serving the community." -- participant


"I'm really glad I did the camp.  Even if I decided to focus on another subject, there are still ways for me to apply it to a criminal justice career." -- participant


"We went into a gun vault at the FBI Building and saw so many guns and ballistic vests.  It was so amazing!" -- participant


"The Criminal Justice Camp was definitely an unforgettable experience.  My daughter thought each day was interesting, and the camp provided real world experience and not just lecture."  -- parent

    

Check out our some of our Summer Camp photos

 

UTSA Criminal Justice Highlights from University of Texas at San Antonio

 Download flyer                                     

News & Events

The UTSA College of Public Policy's graduate program in social work has been ranked 91 among the top 100 social work graduate programs in the country by the U.S. News & World Report's 2016 College Rankings Guide. The program is also ranked 5th among social work programs of Texas universities.
Full story here.

News


Register for 2nd Binational Conference México-United States, Nov. 15-16 
The transnational responsibility of social work in migratory processes
For more information, visit http://copp.utsa.edu/binationalconference
Click here to register for the conference

Social work students close to implementing child care for graduate students at the Downtown Campus
A child care program could launch by spring semester with the help of La Trinidad United Methodist Church (San Antonio Express-News)

Social Work Communities Class wins COSA Grant!

Candace Christensen and the graduate students in her SW Advanced Communities Course were awarded $900 from the City of San Antonio Challenge Grant! Their program will address safety issues raised in a community needs assessment of the Westside of San Antonio. The Festival to be held in conjunction with the Madonna Neighborhood Place will provide safety education and awareness through collaborative presentations from law enforcement and other community organizations.

Roadrunner Pantry!

We will be holding a collection during the last class event for the Roadrunner Pantry. The purpose of this collection is to get non-expired, non-perishable items such as cereal, peanut butter/jelly, oatmeal, hygiene products, crackers, etc. for students who may be struggling to make ends meet. If you have any questions feel free to contact UCfoodpantry@utsa.edu.


2018 Hogg Foundation for Mental Health Scholarship

The Hogg Foundation for Mental Health has made available a one-year scholarship in the amount of $5,000 for students who have completed or are about to complete their first year of studies in the program (fall 2016 entrants).

Eligible applicants must meet the following requirements:

  • Be pursuing a master’s degree in Social Work (MSW or MSSW) at one of 12 Texas graduate programs that are accredited or pending accreditation by the Council on Social Work Education.
  • Have completed (or be about to complete) their first year of graduate studies in social work and be prepared to enter their second year in the program in the fall of 2018.
  • Demonstrate their commitment to pursuing a career in providing mental health services to underserved/underrepresented individuals and their communities in Texas upon obtaining their MSW or MSSW degree.

**Check back soon for fall 2018 application

Required documents include:

  • Cover sheet with your first and last name, Banner ID, telephone number; e-mail address, and date of submission;
  • Copy of your resume; and
  • Personal statement (500 word maximum) that addresses the following points:
  • -Your career goals;
  • -Why you chose social work as a career;
  • -Experience to date (if any) in providing mental health services;
  • -How a Master’s degree in Social Work will help you achieve your career goals;
  • -Impact you intend to achieve as a professional social worker; and
  • -Your need to receive this award.

The Department of Social Work Scholarship Committee will nominate a student for this scholarship based on applicants received. The nominee must then be recommended for the scholarship formally by the Chair of the UTSA Social Work Department.

Questions about this scholarship opportunity should be addressed to Derek Plantenga, Department of Social Work Graduate Advisor of Record, by telephone at 458-2026 or via e-mail at derek.plantenga@utsa.edu.


Chair’s Welcome

Welcome to the Department of Public Administration at UTSA. We are all excited about the continued growth of our program, in terms of both students and faculty. We started our Bachelor of Public Administration (BPA) undergraduate degree in the fall of 2011 and believe that this program will serve a need for training future public and nonprofit employees. 

We also offer the MPA program which is ideal for those that want to work in the public sector or want to advance in their current career; it’s the degree of choice for those who have a 'passion for public service'.  The MPA program has been carefully reevaluated and honored with re-accreditation by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA). 

I would like to welcome you to contact me to discuss our programs.  They are sure to meet your education and career goals.

Sincerely,

Christopher G. Reddick, Ph.D.  
Professor and Department Chair
Editor-in-Chief, International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age
Book Series Editor, Public Administration and Information Technology
Department of Public Administration
The University of Texas at San Antonio
501 W. César E. Chávez Boulevard
San Antonio, Texas 78207-4415 USA
Phone: (210) 458-2501
Fax: (210) 458-2536
Email: chris.reddick@utsa.edu

Alpha Phi Sigma

Alpha Phi Sigma:

The National Criminal Justice Honor Society

History

In September, 1941, Dr. Vivian Anderson Leonard was asked by the president of Washington State University if he would accept the directorship of a Police Science Academic Program at Washington State. Dr. Leonard accepted the offer and became responsible for developing a four year curriculum which would lead to a Bachelor's Degree in Police Administration.

Upon his arrival at Washington State, Dr. Leonard began to realize how important it was that a Police Science Honorary be established. The purpose of this honorary would be to promote excellence in scholarship and performance. In January, 1942, Dr. Leonard met with seventeen Police Science majors at Washington state and Alpha Phi Sigma was established. Glenn Hill was elected as the first president and appointed a committee to draft the first Constitution and By-laws.

During its initial years Alpha Phi Sigma experienced only limited growth, but on March 24, 1976 in Dallas, Texas, the Executive Board of the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences voted unanimously to designate Alpha Phi Sigma as the National Criminal Justice Honor Society. At this time, Alpha Phi Sigma had only fourteen chapters; however, since then, Alpha Phi Sigma has continued to grow and prosper at a very rapid rate and there are now over three hundred and sixty Chapters.

Over the years the National Officers have been located at Universities across the country, such as, Washington State University, Midwestern State University, Eastern Kentucky University, Texas Woman's University, Fairmont State College, Marshall University, Tarleton State University, Florida International University, Boise State University, University of Houston ~ Downtown.

Requirements of Alpha Phi Sigma

Alpha Phi Sigma is the nationally recognized honor society for students in the Criminal Justice sciences. The society recognizes academic excellence by undergraduates as well as graduates of Criminal Justice.

To become a member, the student must have completed one-third of their total hours required for graduation at his/her institution. The student must be recommended, to Nationals, by the chapter advisor.

  • Undergraduate students must maintain a minimum of 3.2 overall GPA on a 4.0 scale in Criminal Justice courses. The student must also rank in the top 35% of their classes and have completed a minimum of four courses within the Criminal Justice curriculum. The Honor Society is open to those with a declared Criminal Justice major or minor.
  • Graduate students are required to maintain a minimum of a 3.4 GPA in both Criminal Justice courses and overall courses, on a 4.0 scale. Student must have completed a minimum of four courses within the Criminal Justice curriculum.
  • Law students enrolled in law school, having completed one academic year, with a grade point average of 2.5 or higher, on a 4.0 scale.

Resources

News

Featured Story:  Alpha Phi Sigma's Hurricane Harvey donation drive was a success

 Alpha Phi Sigma (APS), the National Criminal Justice Honor Society, organized a donation drive for those impacted by Hurricane Harvey.  Many residents near the gulf coast regions of Texas in Rockport, Victoria, Houston, and other communities lost their homes, livelihood, and personal possessions.  Thousands were displaced to various shelters with little food, water, clothing, etc.  Thanks to the help of organizations and people across the country, donations of basic necessities were delivered to local shelters for survivors of Harvey.  Alpha Phi Sigma kept the momentum going by asking for items from students, faculty, and staff within the College of Public Policy; the community; and UTSA to help with the relief efforts.  In a period of three days APS collected over 1,837 pounds of non perishable food items, over 174 pounds of hygiene products and over 146 pounds of bottled water.

APS members also contributed over 60 volunteer hours assisting The San Antonio Food Bank in the collection and distribution of food items.

Alpha Phi Sigma UTSA Chapter Organization donated $200.00 towards the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund.

Lecturer Henry Meade, advisor to Alpha Phi Sigma, thanks everyone in COPP, UTSA, and the criminal justice community.

Spotlight

Learn more about the Alpha Phi Sigma members and student spotlights by clicking here.

For more information, contact:

Henry Meade
UTSA Chapter Advisor

Theta Omicron Chapter
DB 2.212
210.458.3044 voice
210.458.2680 fax

henry.meade@utsa.edu

About Us

Welcome to the Department of Demography at The University of Texas at San Antonio!

The Department of Demography provides training intended to increase the understanding of the size, distribution, composition and growth of human populations. Our program focuses on developing an understanding of the conceptual basis of population structure, processes, analytical methods, and related policy issues. We offer a Ph.D. in Applied Demography and the focus of the Ph.D. program is on the application of demographic analysis analyses to policy issues encountered in the public and private sectors.

The Department, through the College of Public Policy, provides financial support as many as 8 full time students. The Departmental Office and most faculty offices are located on the second floor of the University’s Monterey Building.

The Department of Demography was established and the Ph.D. in Applied Demography was approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in January of 2006. The first class of students enrolled in the Fall Semester 2006.

New concentrations for the Applied Demography Ph.D.

The UTSA Graduate Council has approved a series of concentrations for the Applied Demography degree as a partnership with the UTSA Department of Sociology. For details, consult the graduate catalog.

The Applied Demography Society (Graduate Student Organization)


Giving:

Contributions to COPP/UTSA provide student scholarships, research fellowships, faculty research support, new programs that benefit students and the general public, endowed chairs, a source of flexible funds, and more.

Contact Information 

Monterey Building, 2.270

301 South Frio Street

San Antonio, TX 78207

Phone: 210-458-3163
Department Email: dem@utsa.edu

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Academic Program

    For Current information on the Ph.D. in Applied demography, consult the graduate catalog entry:

    2017-2019 Graduate Catalog

    The Applied Demography Ph.D. requires students to complete a minimum of 42 hours of organized coursework and a minimum of 12 hours of dissertation credits for a total of at least 54 hours beyond the master’s degree. The doctoral program has a base of core courses that will result in all students having a firm grounding in demography and related areas of statistics with students then choosing their area of specialization. All students will be required to complete the core courses listed below and a set of courses in their chosen area of specialization.

    Advising

    Students in need of advising should contact the department’s Graduate Advisor of Record, Dr. Corey Sparks by email at  corey.sparks@utsa.edu


Current Students

Current Students

Below are some links that may be useful for our current students

Applied Demography Society YOUR STUDENT ORGANIZATION!

International Program office

Institutional Review Board

CITI Training (All students must complete this prior to the dissertation phase, for questions contact the department)

Thesis and Dissertation Information

UTSA Sponsored Research Homepage

UTSA Graduate Student Organizations

Graduate Student Professional Development Awards

Conference Abstract Approval Form


Like to see something else listed? Contact the webmaster


Here is a directory of our current Ph.D. students and their research interests

NAME RESEARCH INTERESTS
Serge Atherwood Social demography, life course of Gen Y
Jewel Barnett Food insecurity, childhood obesity
Andrea Bautista-León Immigration, life course, education
Jamiko Deleveaux Immigration
Noelia Flores Reproductive health
Dorian Galindo-Jones Educational demography
Andres Gallardo Energy, inequality
Todd Garrard Urbanization and crime
Federico Girimoldi Breast cancer prevention, immigration
Kahli Hendrick-Romano Social inequality, education
Stephanie Hernandez Reproductive health, health disparities
Howard Hughes Veteran's Health
William Kazanis Mental health disparities
Jeongsoo Kim Fertility, labor markets
Daniela Krotzer Disability
Francisco Lesso-Garcia International migration, remittances, poverty
Xiaoling Liang Educational demography,mental health
Jose Louro Healthcare access and utilization, health disparities
Joan Mendoza Health disparities, health policy, poverty
Jessica Omoregie Chronic diseases, health care access, health disparities
Clarissa Ozuna Education, Fertility
Ricardo Ramirez Labor force dynamics
Sara Robinson Health, health disparities, prediabetes 
Ali Roghani Family demography
Amber Salinas Mental health
Lorenzo Sanchez Social Vulnerability to Disasters
Steven Sano Health demography, health disparities, neighborhood effects
Bricio Vasquez Education, youth transitions
Jeffrey Wright Political demography, race and ethnicity

Mission Statement

The Department of Demography provides training intended to increase the understanding of the size, distribution, composition and growth of human populations. Our program focuses on developing an understanding of the conceptual basis of population structure, processes, analytical methods, and related policy issues. The focus of the Ph.D. program is on the application of demographic analysis analyses to policy issues encountered in the public and private sectors.

The Department, through the College of Public Policy, provides financial support as many as 8 full time students. The Departmental Office and most faculty offices are located on the second floor of the University’s Main Building.

The Department of Demography was established and the Ph.D. in Applied Demography was approved by the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in January of 2006. The first class of students enrolled in the Fall Semester 2006. We have a current enrollment of about 32 students.

The Department, through the College of Public Policy and the Institute for Demographic and Socioeconomic Research (IDSER), provides financial support to as many as 8 full time students. The Demography departmental office and most faculty offices are located in suite 2.270 on the second floor of the university’s Monterey Building at the Downtown Campus.

FAQ

Who are the faculty in the Ph.D. program and where do I find information about their areas of research and recent publications?

Please see the faculty section of the Department of Demography on the College of Public Policy website for information on the research interests of our faculty. Recent publications and presentations of our faculty and students may be found on the departmental research page.


Can I enroll on a part-time basis?

Yes, the Ph.D. program has been designed to accommodate both full-time and part-time students.

Note: Full-time students = nine semesters hours or more
Part-time students = less than 9 semester hours


What areas will I specialize in once I am in the program?

The Ph.D. in Applied Demography is designed to enable students to develop a program of study, in collaboration with the Graduate Advisor, around a core set of courses that provide a sound applied demography foundation. Potential and new students are encouraged to explore their career objectives and work with the Graduate Advisor of Record to identify elective courses that will meet the student’s learning and experience objectives.


When are classes taught?

Most classes are taught at the UTSA Downtown Campus during weekday evenings to accommodate students who work during the day. However, there are a few courses which are taught during the afternoon. 


What is the application deadline for the Ph.D. Program?

The priority funding deadline for applications is November 1st, applicants desiring funding should plan on having all materials submitted to the graduate school on or before this date. 

For those applicants applying for part time admission, or for those who do not wish to be considered for funding, please have all materials submitted to the graduate school by the February 1st deadline.

Applications are for fall term entry only.


How do I apply?

Go to the Graduate School website and apply online. We strongly urge all applicants to contact Dr. Corey Sparks, the Graduate Advisor of Record, prior to applying.


Are there any pre-requisites for admission?

In addition to satisfying the University-wide requirements for admission to graduate programs, all prospective students must have a Bachelor’s degree and a Master of Science or Master of Art degree from an accredited university in demography/sociology, geography, economics, biology, political science, statistics, mathematics, business or similar fields. Students who have not earned a qualifying masters degree may be required to complete the equivalent courses in the appropriate discipline area before admission to the Ph.D. program in Applied Demography.


What are the application requirements?

Official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate course work completed. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing). Scores must be for test taken within the past five years. Submit a sample written paper or report. Three letters of recommendation. At least two letters must assess your academic and research capabilities and others may be from persons representing the work or professional sector. A letter of application describing the applicant’s academic and work backgrounds. Be specific about your research goals and objectives related to the doctorate in Applied Demography. International students from non-English speaking countries must also submit a score of at least 550 on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Score must be for test taken within the past two years.


I have taken the GRE but it has been more than five years ago, can I have the GRE waived for my application?

No, a recent (within the past 5 years) score is required by the university for Ph.D. applicants. GRE scores must be submitted by the May 1st application deadline.


What should I include in my letter of application?

In this letter, you should describe yourself and your academic and work backgrounds. Be specific about your research goals and objectives related to the doctorate in Applied Demography and what your expectations of the program are in furthering your career objectives.


Are assistantships available and if so, how can I apply?

Yes, we anticipate considering applicants for research assistantships. Assistantship stipends are competitive with other universities and are granted on a competitive basis. To apply, you must inform the department that you wish to be considered for an assistantship. Assistantships are only available for full-time students entering the program. You may not have external employment if you hold a graduate assistantship. 


Do I need any advising prior to applying for the Ph.D. program?

Yes.We typically feel it is very beneficial for you to contact the Graduate Advisor of Record, Corey Sparks, Ph.D before applying. You may contact him via e-mail at corey.sparks@utsa.edu.


Who should I contact with questions about the Ph.D. program, its admissions process, and requirements?

Advising - Students in need of advising should contact the department’s Graduate Advisor of Record, Dr. Corey Sparks at (210) 458-3166 

IDSER

The Institute for Demographic and Socioeconomic Research (IDSER) is the largest applied demographic research institute in Texas and is directed by Dr. Lloyd Potter and operates collaboratively with the Department of Demography. IDSER faculty and staff conduct ongoing analyses of the impacts of demographic change on Texas and other parts of the nation. The Institute employs several full-time Demography Ph.D. students on research projects.

Located in the Institute for Demographic and Socioeconomic Research is the Texas State Data Center which supplies, distributes and analyzes demographic data for the state, providing extensive access to demographic and other databases on its website. It also completes annual population estimates and biennial projections which are used for facility, personnel, and budgetary planning by state agencies and others in the State of Texas.

Dr. Lloyd Potter serves as a State Demographer of Texas providing expertise and advice to the state in regard to demographic issues. The Texas State Data Center serves as the San Antonio Office of the State Demographer. Please contact Beverly Pecotte (210) 458-6543, for more information.

The Institute for Demographic and Socioeconomic Research (IDSER) is located on the 4th floor of the Monterey Building at UTSA’s downtown campus.

About Us

Welcome to the Department of Criminal Justice at UTSA

 

The Department of Criminal Justice is housed under the College of Public Policy. Our main office is located on the UTSA Downtown Campus, in the Durango Building at 4.112.

We are proud to offer our students a wide array of studies including a minor in Criminal Justice, Bachelor of Arts degree through our undergraduate program along with a Master of Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology through our graduate program.

In addition to their classroom studies, all undergraduate Criminal Justice majors complete an internship in a local criminal justice agency. Students completing their bachelor's degree may pursue professional careers in the criminal justice system, government or the private sector, as well as apply for admission to law school or other graduate programs.

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology provides competencies in research methods and statistics, justice policy planning and analysis and skills for managing criminal justice agencies. Students completing the Master's Degree Program may advance in their current careers or prepare for admission to doctoral programs.

Our faculty members teach and conduct research on a wide range of topics in criminal justice and criminology and publish in top tier journals.

For more information, contact:

Department of Criminal Justice
Durango Building (DB), Room 4.112
501 W. Cesar E. Chavez Blvd
San Antonio, TX 78207
210.458.2535 voice
210.458.2680 fax

Office Hours:
Monday - Friday
8:00am - 5:00pm

Academics


MSW Program Curriculum & Degree Requirements

Please see our Student Handbook for specific information about curriculum and degree requirements. 


UTSA Bluebook (Syllabi)

https://bluebook.utsa.edu/


UTSA Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

UTSA_Assessment_of_Student_Learning_Outcomes.docx


UTSA's Libraries

http://lib.utsa.edu/


Blackboard

http://learn.utsa.edu/


Graduate Catalog

Graduate Catalog

Student Life


Student Organization & Clubs

The Social Work Council is a student organization at the University of Texas at San Antonio. All students of UTSA's MSW program are automatically members, so there is no need to apply to join the organization or pay for any membership fees. We are social work students who are making a difference in our community through collaboration and action to meet needs and empower the students and professionals of social work. We use primarily our Facebook group to keep in communication with students about our upcoming events. If you have any questions or suggestions for organizations to team up with or volunteer for in the future, we can also be reached by e-mail at socialworkcouncil210@gmail.com. Please visit our Facebook site at https://www.facebook.com/UTSASWC

.


Professional Organizations

Learn more about the National Association of Social Workers

Learn more about the Council on Social Work Education



Athletics & Recreation

Visit our amazing Campus Recreation site



Graduation

Please visit to the Registrar's website for Graduation Information



Career Resources

There are various opportunities for students to learn about future careers, interviewing skills, and job preparation. Below are some of the fields and jobs in which you will find social workers (including many of our alumni). For specific information about questions you may have please contact the Graduate Adviser of Record for our department (210-458-3000) or your assigned faculty mentor.


- Students can become clinicians/direct practice social workers in health care, mental health, child welfare/child and family services, schools, juvenile and adult probation/parole/corrections, with the homeless, in substance abuse treatment facilities. They can provide case management in similar settings, or they can focus on macro practice, working in congressional, legislative and city and state government offices assisting in shaping policy or in advocating for clients and their needs in community agencies. They can work with abused and neglected children in a variety of settings, as adoption workers, helping families to move from welfare to self-sufficiency, or become administrators of human services organizations.


- Former students are working as supervisors at the SAMM transitional living program, as supervisors of Parole at the Texas Youth Commission, and as supervisors or senior workers for Child Protective Services. They are also working as clinicians at San Antonio State Hospital, as social workers with local HIV programs, at children's transplant programs, and as program managers at a family violence program.

Admissions


Apply Now!

Application


MSW Admissions

The UTSA Master of Social Work (MSW) program prepares students for advanced social work practice. Graduates work in professional positions serving diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities (see National Association of Social Workers website for more information about the profession and career opportunities). Students graduating from the program demonstrate a commitment to cultural competence, multidimensional contextual practice, social responsibility, and transformative social work.

Admission requirements for all students include:

- A completed graduate application form submitted to the UTSA Graduate School, including official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended;

- A narrative statement addressing interest in and fit with the UTSA MSW program, not to exceed 1250 words (approximately five pages) Click here for a PDF version of the narrative statement guidelines.

- Three department recommendation forms completed by professionals familiar with the applicant’s preparation for graduate social work education;

- Department forms documenting prior professional and volunteer experiences and academic preparation in the liberal arts;

- For international students, results of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) not more than five years old and a score of not less than 79 (Internet) or 550 (paper), or results of the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) not more than five years old and a score of not less than 6.5.

All forms and instructions are available online through the UTSA's Graduate School.

**Application deadlines can be found here: http://graduateschool.utsa.edu/admissions/masters-degree-application-deadlines/

Degree Options

The Department offers two degree options: the 60-hour curriculum available to those students who have undergraduate degrees in something other than social work; and the 36-hour curriculum for those students who have a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work (BSW) from a social work program accredited by the Council of Social Work Education. These students may enter the program as an advanced standing student, although additional admissions documents will be required. Transfer students from an accredited MSW program are also considered for acceptance into the program.

Students may enter the MSW program either full-time or part-time during the fall or spring semesters. Courses are offered primarily during evening hours, with a limited number of day courses, to accommodate a range of student work schedules.

Students in the 60-hour program complete 900 clock hours of field practicum, and those in the 36-hour program complete 450 hours. 

Tuition & Fees

Information about tuition and fees can be found at Graduate School Tuition and Fees.


Financial Aid

Information about financial aid at UTSA can be found at the Office of Student Financial Aid.


Request More Information

Contact Us


Licensing Pass Rate
The UTSA Master of Social Work (MSW) program prepares students to be licensed social work practitioners! Check out the percentage of our students who pass the MSW licensing exam, which is higher than the national average passage rate, here .

A closer look

Check out the latest video for the UTSA College of Public Policy

Field Education

Community Partners

The UTSA social work program enjoys partnerships with a wide range of government and non-government social service- related organizations. These organizations collaborate with students, faculty, and staff to provide practicum experiences, research opportunities, and agency, neighborhood and community change efforts that strengthen services to clients. Click  HERE for a list of organizations we currently partner with for field placements.

Field Education Requirements

A description of the required field education component of the MSW program and all of its requirements can be found in the  Student Handbook  starting on page 36.

Contact Us

Rae Wilson; Director of Field Director; BV 3.308; 210.458.3009; rae.wilson@utsa.edu

Amy Manning-Thompson; Field Coordinator; 210.458.3002; Amy.manningthompson@utsa.edu

Title IV-E (SWEPT)

UTSA Social Work Education Program Title IV-E (SWEPT)

Dr. Jolyn Mikow is the director of our department's Title IV-E program. The program (SWEPT) operates with federal funds made available through Title IV-E of the Social Security Act, providing financial support for Texas Child Protective Services employees and UTSA social work students committed to a career in public child welfare. SWEPT provides this training and educational program for the Texas Department of Protective and Family Services Regions 8 and 11. This is a great opportunity for students that are eligible. Applications are accepted year round. If you have questions please contact Dr. Jolyn Mikow (jolyn.mikow@utsa.edu; 210.458.3005).


CPS Region 8 Applications

Frequently Asked Questions Region 8

CPS Region 11 Applications

Frequently Asked Questions Region 11

Alumni

Alumni Association

The Social Work Alumni Group (SWAG) is a group comprised of graduates from our MSW program. Aimee Devine is the head of the group, and she can be contacted at aimeerdevine@gmail.com

For the most up-to-date news please visit www.utsaswag.org or the SWAG Facebook Page.

Texas Licensure Exam

The first step in this process is to complete a  Degree Completion Request Form  from the College of Public Policy Dean’s Office the semester you plan to graduate (this letter will allow you to start the licensing application process). When completed, the degree completion letter can either be picked up from the Dean’s Office or the Dean’s Office will mail it to you using the address you provide on the request form. You should then go to the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners TSBSWE and begin the licensing exam application process. Note that all students will need to complete the Jurisprudence Exam as a threshold requirement for applying to take the licensing exam. (This exam is not time-limited and does not require advanced preparation.) Once you have submitted an application to the Texas State Board of Social Work Examiners, there is a processing time that may be as long as several months before you receive notice that you are eligible to take the exam. Exam results, however, are received quickly, and UTSA students have a high first-time passage rate on the exam.

You should become familiar with the latest information about legislative and other changes in the Texas social work licensing process, which can be found at NASWTX.

Practice exams can be found on the Association of Social Work Boards website, ASWB, the national entity that hosts state social work licensing testing for most states. The National Association of Socialworkers of Texas site, NASWTX, also lists a number of providers that offer test preparation workshops for a fee.

About Us

Welcome to the Department of Public Administration! 

The Department of Public Administration began in 1982 as a master's degree within a department office. It has since grown into an internationally-accredited program by the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA). Currently housed under the College of Public Policy, the department has over 200 active students within our different program offerings. Located at the UTSA Downtown Campus, our students enjoy access to the city center and a diverse community of nonprofit organizations, policy workers, government offices, and cultural institutions.

Faculty work diligently as mentors and advisors, guiding students toward their course requirements. Student support includes internship guidance, scholarships and graduate research assistantships.

Offering the Bachelor's and Master's degrees in Public Administration, the Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Administration and Leadership, and several undergraduate minors, students graduate from UTSA with the skills necessary to work within public, private and nonprofit realms, making a difference in their communities and for themselves.  Our alumni hold a variety of nonprofit management and government positions at the local, state and federal levels.

Whether a returning student or just beginning your academic goals, the Department of Public Administration's program offerings are useful for those already established in their fields, as well as those pursuing new or alternative careers.

Address:

The University of Texas at San Antonio
College of Public Policy
Department of Public Administration
Durango Bldg., Room 4.114
501 W. César E. Chávez Blvd.
San Antonio, TX 78207

Phone:  (210) 458-2533

Office Hours:  Monday - Friday | 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Internships

Internships

Public Administration Internships Overview

The goal of the Department of Public Administration, in assisting with placement of students in an organization or agency, is to further student’s academic study through practical work experience while informing them about the needs of the public, private or nonprofit sectors.

Enrollment procedures

Students interested in enrolling in internship hours should follow these steps:

As much as possible, students should pursue their own internship opportunities, including reviewing websites like UTSA Career Services. A student’s academic advisor and the department’s list of internship sites can also help in choosing an appropriate site;

Because of new agreement policies required by UTSA, all students interested in completing an internship must work with their agency site before the semester when they want to complete their internship. See the deadlines listed below;

Complete the internal internship approval form . This form requires students to identify a site supervisor who will oversee the student's internship, complete an evaluation, and verify hours worked at the end of the internship.

The Internship Coordinator and/or administrative staff will be in contact with students regarding deadlines, requirements and the process for completing course registration. They will also work with the intern's direct supervisor to ensure the internship continues to be beneficial for both the student and the organization. A syllabus will be provided to registered students by the course's instructor of record. Failure to submit required components of the internship can result in not receiving credit for the course. 

No work can begin until all necessary paperwork is approved.

Deadlines for Declaring Internship Interest

Internship approval forms should be turned in the semester prior to the intended semester, no later than:

Spring Semester internship – October 15
Fall Semester internship – July 1
Summer Semester internship – April 1

Previous Internship Sites

Previous internship sites have included:

San Antonio Food Bank

LiftFund

The DoSeum

Roberto Trevino, City Council, District 1

Family Service Association

Partial listing of currently available internship opportunities

U S Department of State

City of San Antonio Internship Positions

USAJobs -  Pathways for Students & Recent Graduates to Federal Careers

Current Internship Directory - Released by the U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Civil Rights - a publication with a wealth of information for interns in the Washington, DC area

Internship Forms To Be Completed By the Intern

Course Internship Approval Form (begins the internship process)

Internship Time Sheets

Internship Site Evaluation By the Intern

Forms For the Internship Site

Internship Agency Information Sheet (required to begin the affiliation agreements)

Site Supervisor Mid-Term Evaluation

Site Supervisor Final Evaluation

For questions about internships or information concerning internship opportunities, please call 210-458-2533

Bachelor of Public Administration and Nonprofit Minor Internship Information

Undergraduate Internship Information for Bachelor of Public Administration and Nonprofit Minor Students

BPA students don’t have the internship course as a requirement for their program of study but they may complete an internship within nonprofit, public or select private agencies as part of their elective course choices.

Students from any discipline who are completing the Nonprofit Minor must complete PAD 4933 (3 credit hours). Students completing other certificates or minors may have additional requirements in addition to those for the Nonprofit Minor. It is recommended that students communicate directly with those offices responsible for the certification or with their advisor.

Prerequisites: Approval by the Department Chair and consent of the instructor of record in the course’s intended semester.

Steps to Starting Your Internship:

Seeking Agency Placement

1. Using Career Center resources, students prepare a resume. Students must draft a resume (UTSA Career Center Resume Basics) and schedule an appointment with the Career Center to review the resume. Make changes to the resume, according to Career Center feedback.

2. As much as possible, students should pursue their own internship opportunities. A student's academic advisor and the department's database of internship sites can also help in choosing an appropriate site. Students should also consider resources available from UTSA Career Services.

3. Student initiates contact with the agency of interest, sometimes multiple agencies need to be contacted (verify Agency Agreement is in place).

4. Student will interview with agency.

5. Identify agency of interest for internship placement, complete Agency Interest Form.

6. Complete Internship Approval Form (student) and get approval of Internship Coordinator.

7. Once signatures are obtained and Agency Agreements are in place, take the Internship Approval Form to Advising Office to register for class.

Prior to and During Agency Internship

1. Student will receive a course syllabus with internship course expectations and responsibilities.

2. Student must complete responsibilities prior to the last exam date in order to be awarded a grade.

The Internship Coordinator and/administrative staff will be in contact with students regarding deadlines, internship requirements and the process for completing course registration. They will also work with the intern's direct supervisor to ensure the internship continues to be beneficial for both students and the organization.

Where to Intern:

Seek out an internship that provides significant managerial or project-related experience in the public and nonprofit sectors. Private sector activities related to public administration may also be considered. When applying to do an internship, students must keep in mind that a preferred organization may have particular procedures for potential interns that could delay meeting the department’s deadlines.

In particular, in completing the Nonprofit Minor, the instructor of record will want to see how the minor connects with a student’s major study, academic and/or career goals.

FAQ for Undergraduates Completing an Internship

The syllabus requires I complete a resume, meet with Career Services and have a mock interview – what is the benefit of these extra steps?

As an undergraduate, your work experience may not be in the fields you are interested in for your long-term career goals. Additionally, the organization you are interested in will have a unique culture or expectation of its interns. Building your resume will positively affect your ability to gain the internship that will most benefit your goals.

Why do I need to complete time sheets?

Time sheets verify that you are completing the work hours required for the proper credit for the internship course. Additionally, the detailed duties added to the time sheet are a good reminder of the projects or events you have completed – this will help in completing your final paper for the course. And finally, if you work at a smaller agency, you may often be working alone. A time sheet allows your direct supervisor to remain aware of the work you’ve completed – which, in turn, can help them in completing your mid-term and final evaluations.

For questions about internship processing or information concerning internship opportunities please contact Karen Metz at 210-458-2533 or karen.metz@utsa.edu

Graduate Internship Information

Graduate Internships in the Master of Public Administration program

MPA students without previous public service employment (those designated as "Pre-service" upon admission) must complete (6) semester hours of internship credit.

Students have the option of enrolling in PAD 6963 (3 credit hours) in two separate semesters, or PAD 6966 (6 credit hours) in one semester to meet the six (6) hour requirement.  Students are expected to complete 300 work hours for 6 internship credit hours or 150 work hours for 3 internship credit hours.

Prerequisites: Good academic standing, consent of the instructor of record in the course’s intended semester and 18 semester credits of graduate work.

Where to Intern

Seek out an internship that provides significant managerial or project-related experience in public and nonprofit sectors. Private sector activities related to public administration may also be considered. When applying to do an internship, students must keep in mind that a preferred organization may have particular procedures for potential interns that could delay meeting the department’s deadlines.

FAQ for Graduates Needing an Internship

Do I need to do an internship?

If you have a strong work experience and background, you may submit a resume and cover letter to demonstrate the attainment of leadership roles and practices to the GAR for review. Satisfactory submissions result in a waiver for the internship requirement. These waiver requests should be submitted no later than the semester prior to your planned graduation date. Please see the MPA Student Handbook for more information on the waiver process.

Can my internship beginning and ending dates differ from semester dates?

Some organizations have specific projects with their own deadlines. Contact the Department staff to review the requirements for the organization. It is never the position of the Department to have to deny a unique opportunity to a student.

Is it possible for my agency to host an internship?

Potential internship host sites should speak with Department staff or the Internship Coordinator for assistance in determining eligibility. Internship sites must be willing to complete University required Affiliation Agreements.

For questions about internship processing or information concerning internship opportunities please contact Karen Metz at 210-458-2533 or karen.metz@utsa.edu.

Scholarships

Scholarships

Scholarship application materials are available at the Department Office, Durango Building, room 4.114. For questions about Public Administration scholarships or information about scholarship opportunities, please contact:

Karen E. Metz, Administrative Associate II

(210)-458-2533

Diane Gutierrez, Senior Administrative Associate

(210)-458-2534

2017-2018 Scholarship applications have been closed.  Please return next year to apply for 2018-2019 opportunities.


Undergraduate (BPA)

  • The USAA Foundation Scholarship 

This scholarship is available to incoming or current undergraduate students with a declared major in Public Administration.  Students must be enrolled full-time and have a GPA of 3.0 or higher and must show demonstrated financial need, verified through the filing of a FAFSA application.



  • Samuel A. & Pamela R. Kirkpatrick Endowed Presidential Scholarship

The Samuel A. & Pamela R. Kirkpatrick Endowed Presidential Scholarship was established to support community service by awarding undergraduate students with a declared Minor in Nonprofit Management.  Student selection will be based on merit and need, along with involvement in unpaid community service with nonprofit agencies, public agencies, local hospitals, religious institutions or the military.  Students must also demonstrate financial need as determined by UTSA's Office of Student Financial Aid.  Students need to be enrolled at UTSA for at least 6 credit hours and must have a minimum cumulative GPA of at least 2.0.



  • The Canseco Scholarship Fund for Laredo, Texas

The Canseco Scholarship Fund is awarded to students who have graduated from a high school in Webb County, Texas or are a current resident. Students must be enrolled on a full-time basis and actively pursing an undergraduate and graduate degree within the College of Public Policy. Minimum GPA requirements are 2.5 for undergraduate students and 3.0 for graduate students.


Graduate (MPA)

  • The Lauren Miller and Steven Douglas Walthour Endowed Scholarship

The Department is pleased to announce The Lauren Miller and Steven Douglas Walthour Endowed Scholarship to be awarded for the first time in Fall 2016.  Applications are currently being accepted for students pursuing a MPA degree with a GPA of 3.0 or greater.  Students must be enrolled at least 6 hours per semester.


  • Dominion Rotary Club Past President’s Fund

The Dominion Rotary Club Past President’s Fund is an endowed award offered annually to a degree-seeking student of the MPA program with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0. The chosen Dominion Scholar will be required to give a brief talk at a luncheon with members of the Dominion Rotary Club. Applications should be submitted directly to the Department office.


  • Rubén Munguía Endowed Scholarship 

The Rubén Munguía Endowed Scholarship in Public Administration is an endowed award offered annually to an outstanding MPA Student. Eligible students must be a degree-seeking MPA student enrolled in at least 6 hours and with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.



  • Juanita Firestone Endowed Memorial Scholarship

The Juanita Firestone Endowed Memorial Scholarship is awarded to graduate students in Public Administration.  Eligible students must be enrolled at least 6 hours per semester with a minimum GPA of 3.0.


  • The Canseco Scholarship Fund for Laredo, Texas

The Canseco Scholarship Fund for Laredo, Texas, is awarded to students who have graduated from a high school in Webb County, Texas or are a current resident.  Students must be enrolled on a full-time basis and actively pursing an undergraduate and graduate degree within the College of Public Policy.  Minimum GPA requirements are 2.5 for undergraduate students and 3.0 for graduate students.



For information about scholarships sponsored or administered directly by the University visit http://www.utsa.edu/scholarships/.

The College of Public Policy also offers the COPP Scholar Award to newly admitted first time freshmen and transfer students in the fall semester.   The COPP Scholars Program was created by the College of Public Policy in 2014 as a way to provide financial support to outstanding students and attract the state’s highest achieving students. This award comes with a $1,000 stipend to be applied towards tuition and fees, as long as the students maintain a good academic standing.  Eligibility is based on SAT or ACT scores, high school class rank and/or transfer GPA. For questions, please contact the Dean's office at (210) 458-2530 or email copp@utsa.edu

Graduate Program

Master of Science Degree in Criminal Justice and Criminology

The Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Criminal Justice and Criminology is designed to provide students with competency in research, policy planning, evaluation, agency management, and preparation for continued graduate study in criminal justice and criminology. The program assists students to develop and apply research expertise toward the resolution of contemporary practice and policy issues.

Click HERE to access the MSCJC Student Handbook

Program Admission Requirements
**Applications available for fall entry only.

To qualify for unconditional admission, applicants must:

  • satisfy University-wide graduate admission requirements
  • possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university or equivalent training at a foreign institution
  • have a grade point average of 3.0 or better in the last 60 semester credit hours of undergraduate work as well as all previous graduate work
  • have 18 hours in criminal justice, criminology, or a closely-related discipline, or professional experience in the justice system
  • be in good standing at the last institution attended
  • have the recommendation of the Criminal Justice and Criminology Graduate Program Committee

Students who do not meet these criteria may be admitted conditionally or on probation as degree-seeking depending on the nature of the deficiency. Admission as a special student may be considered by the Graduate Program Committee upon request of the applicant.

Applicants must submit the following:

  • all transcripts
  • two letters of recommendation
  • a resume
  • a personal statement

GRE scores are optional; applicants can strengthen their application for admission by submitting their GRE test scores.

Click HERE to apply today

Degree Requirements

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for the degree, exclusive of other study to remove deficiencies, is 36. Degree candidates must complete the following three requirements:

A. Core Courses Required for All Students (15 SCH)

CRJ 5073 Research Methods

CRJ 5083 Quantitative Analysis

CRJ 5103 The Criminal Justice System

CRJ 5123 Criminal Justice Policy

CRJ 6373 Criminological Theory

Students are expected to complete the majority of core courses prior to enrolling in elective courses. Normally, students should enroll in CRJ 5073, CRJ 5103 and CRJ 6373 in their first semester and CRJ 5083 and CRJ 5123 in their second semester.

B. Electives (15 SCH)

At least 9 semester credit hours of prescribed electives from the list below; and up to 6 semester credit hours of free electives may be taken outside of the discipline in related UTSA graduate programs with approval of the Graduate Advisor of Record (GAR).

CRJ  5133 Justice Organizations and Administration

CRJ  6103 Seminar on Topics in Theory of Crime and Justice

CRJ  6123 Seminar on Topics in Research Methods

CRJ  6203 Seminar on Topics in Corrections Policy

CRJ  6213 Gender and Crime

CRJ  6233 Minorities and Crime

CRJ  6303 Seminar on Topics in Policing and Crime Prevention

CRJ  6343 Study Abroad: International Crime and Justice

CRJ  6383 Capstone Course

CRJ  6403 Seminar on Topics in Law and Society

CRJ  6951,3 Independent Study (1 or 3 SCH)

CRJ  6961 Comprehensive Examination (1 SCH)

C. 6 SCH from the following options:

1) Nonthesis Option: Students who select the nonthesis option are required to take the written comprehensive examination and complete two additional electives (6 hours). It is required that one of these additional electives be CRJ 6383 Capstone Course. It is graded as Credit/Non-Credit. This course provides a review of the five core courses from which all exam questions will be drawn. CRJ 6383 Capstone Course will operate as a stand-alone course. A student must complete this course to satisfy the requirements of the degree, but can also receive credit for this course without successfully completing the comprehensive exam. In the event that a student does not pass all five sections, the student must re-take the comprehensive exam in a subsequent semester. Students may only re-take the comprehensive exam twice after the initial attempt; students have one calendar year (two semesters) from their initial attempt to pass the comprehensive exam. Students do not need to re-enroll in CRJ 6383 to re-take the comprehensive exam. Students not enrolled in any other courses would be required to enroll in 1 credit hour of CRJ 6961 Comprehensive Examination in the subsequent long semester in which the student wishes to re-take the comprehensive exam.

2) Thesis Option: This option is available only with permission from an instructor and the Graduate Advisor of Record. Students electing the thesis option are required to enroll in CRJ 6993 or CRJ 6996 Master’s Thesis for a total of 6 credit hours, which includes completion of an oral comprehensive exam (i.e., successful proposal defense). Students failing to complete all requirements of the thesis option within the 6 credit hours would be required to enroll for 1 credit hour of CRJ 6991 Master’s Thesis if no other courses are being taken that term. The Master’s thesis requires compliance with UTSA thesis requirements and a successful final thesis defense.

 

For more information, contact:
Department of Criminal Justice
Durango Bldg. (Downtown Campus) DB 4.112

Marie Tillyer, PhD
phone 210-458-2682
marie.tillyer@utsa.edu

Internships

CRJ 4933 Course Description:

Senior class standing and consent of academic advisor and Internship Coordinator. Additional prerequisites may apply to particular internship sites; consult the Department's Internship Coordinator for information.

Supervised experience in an administrative setting that provides the opportunity to integrate theory and practice in criminal justice-related agencies. May be repeated for credit in a subsequent semester when agency setting varies, but no more than 6 semester credit hours will apply to a bachelor's degree.

Student Eligibility

The undergraduate internship program (CRJ 4933) is available to students who have taken the required prerequisites:

  • CRJ 1113 – American Criminal Justice System
  • CRJ 2153 – Criminological Theory
  • CRJ 3013 – Research Design and Analysis in Criminal Justice

Background investigations by agencies are routine in virtually all student internships. Keep in mind that the initial screening may range from a brief interview and fingerprinting to a very thorough screening process requiring several months. As a result of the agency internship process time, early coordination with the CJ Internship Coordinator and the selected agency is critical.

Enrollment Procedures

For the semester or term in which the course is taken, students must register in accordance with the registration dates published in the UTSA Registration Calendar. Students may not register late. It is highly recommended that students begin preparing for the internship selection/registration process one (1) semester prior to the term in which the course is actually taken.

Students interested in enrolling in the undergraduate internship program must identify an agency and point-of-contact from the Directory of Internship Placements . Once accepted by the agency, the student must meet with the Internship Coordinator and submit a completed Internship Information Form. During this meeting, course requirements will be explained, documentation completed and a permit to register will be issued to the student.

The following links will assist the student in locating an intern site, as well as the downloading of required documentation for the course.

Getting Started

1. Decide Where to Intern

  • If you don't have an agency in mind, start by thinking about the type of experience you want - law enforcement, probation, courts, private security.
  • Once you have decided the type of agency, think about location - San Antonio, Boerne, Live Oak, etc.
  • If you need suggestions on where to intern or names of people to contact, please examine the Directory of Internship Placements to help you get started.

2. Contact Desired Agency

Set up a meeting for an interview with the Point-of-Contact (POC) for the agency to discuss your request to intern with the organization.

The agency may require a(an):

  • Orientation
  • Oral Interview
  • Background Check
  • Fingerprinting
  • Resume
  • Prerequisite Course

3. Receive Permit to Register

Registration for CRJ 4933 is by permit only. The Internship Coordinator will give you a permit after you have been interviewed by an agency representative.

To get a permit:

  • Once you have been accepted for processing by an agency POC, you and the agency must complete the Internship Information Form.
  • Give the completed Internship Information Form to the Internship Coordinator in person during your pre-registration meeting.
  • The Coordinator will then sign a permit and give you the CRN number that you need to register.
  • Register for CRN 4933 - Take your Permit to Register to your academic advisor. The advisor will process you for admission.

Notes about registering:

  • You register after you have had a pre-registration meeting with the Internship Coordinator. The target is to be officially registered prior to when the semester starts.
  • University deadlines apply. See the semester schedule of classes for spring/summer/fall.

4. Begin Your Internship

You must complete 150 hours with your agency. Training sessions count toward the 150 hours. Driving from home to the agency and meal breaks will not be counted as internship hours. Meet with your agency to establish your schedule; which days of the week you will work and what times.

5. Writing Assignments

There are several required writing assignments for CRJ 4933. Writing assignments are worth a total of 60% of your semester grade. Requirements are listed in the course syllabus.

6. Agency Evaluation

The agency's evaluation is worth 40% of the semester grade.

  • The Internship Coordinator will provide forms for you and your agency supervisor to complete.
  • It is your responsibility to make sure your supervisor receives the Workplace Evaluation Form.

For more information, contact:
Mr. Chris Booker
Internship Coordinator

Durango Building 4.112C
210.458.2624 voice
210.458.2680 fax
christopher.booker@utsa.edu

Spring 2017 Office Hours:
Monday/ Wednesday
1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Tuesday/Thursday
10:00 am - 11:45 am and 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Friday
10:00 am - 3:00 pm


Chair’s Welcome

     

Welcome to the Department of Criminal Justice at UTSA!  We currently have 16 tenure-track and non-tenure-track faculty, along with two administrative assistants, and a series of additional instructors that serve our nearly 1,000 undergraduate students and approximately 60 graduate students.

We are devoted to delivering high quality education to these students through our Master of Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology (MSCJC) and our Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice (BA) programs. Our MSCJC program enables students to gain expertise in research, theory, and policy while preparing them for advanced careers in governmental agencies or continued study at the doctoral level. The BA program prepares students for careers in the criminal justice system at the local, state and federal level or for entrance to law school or graduate programs.

Our faculty members are nationally recognized for their scholarship and are committed to innovative research and education. We have expertise in a variety of areas including, but not limited to quantitative and qualitative methodologies, criminological and criminal justice system theories, and substantive expertise in policing, courts, and corrections. Our faculty are active researchers who regularly publish peer-reviewed articles and engage in research funded by federal, state, local, and private sources.

Please take time to peruse our faculty webpage and explore all of the exciting things our department is doing. If you have any questions about our programs or research, please drop by our office (DB 4.112) or contact me directly. We look forward to hearing from you!

Michael Smith, J.D., Ph.D.
Chair and Professor, Department of Criminal Justice
michael.smith2@utsa.edu 
210-458-2686 (direct)

Department of Criminal Justice
Durango Building (DB) 4.112
501 W. Cesar E. Chavez Blvd.
San Antonio, TX 78207
ph. 210-458-2535
fax: 210-458-2680


Study Abroad

For information about the study abroad trip to Spain, please contact the Policy Studies Center at 210-458-2545 or visit the office in BV 4.304.


Check out this graduate student's own account of her study abroad experience in Madrid, Spain this summer.  Nishita Maliek says that her study abroad experience proves there is much more to law enforcement than meets the eye.   Maliek tells her story both from her time spent in Spain as an undergrad and her time as a graduate student.

Nishita Maliek says study abroad experience was an eye opener

by Nishita Maliek

Study abroad to me as an undergrad gave me an aura of independence. The first year I went, I did not know anyone on the trip. Walking into the airport (more my mother dragging me in) was one of the most nerve wracking things I had done because of the element of unsurity. Once we were all checked in, everyone became a family. The biggest thing that stood out to me in Spain was that every one was not always "on the go" like we are here. Although work is important, enjoying life with the simple things (like having a two hour lunch instead of one) is pivotal to them. That in itself was beautiful to me. So often we forget to really enjoy what is in front of us. In terms of Criminal Justice (CRJ) as an undergrad, it helped me see that there is so much more to law enforcement than meets the eye. Going in, I thought I wanted to be lawyer. Leaving, I wanted to work for corrections.

This was due to the fact that we visited the jail in Elche, and saw how important it was for offenders to have the right guidance, support, and resources around them to prevent them from recidivating. The jail visit opened my eyes to not only the lives of correctional officers, but also the life of an inmate. Going as a grad student this past summer, I didn't think I'd get any more out of it than I did the first time. I couldn't have been more wrong. The two things that really made an impact on me was the supreme court in Madrid, and the Al Hambra in Granada. I saw the supreme court in madrid for the first time, and what I thought was amazing was that in the middle of the court there was an outdoor courtyard planted with beautiful flowers. The reason for that is when the job becomes overwhelming and stressful, workers can go outside and de stress. That was beautiful to me. Jobs in CRJ can be draining, mentally physically and emotionally. To have small enjoyable moments can really help ease the tension that weighs down.

Lastly, the Al Hambra. It was my second time seeing it, but it meant so much more. I am a Muslim American and it is not uncommon for that term to be viewed as a bad thing. At the Al Hambra, the tour guide explained to us that although this was muslim territory, all faiths combined to help build and design it. It was beautiful to see how very peacefully different faiths co existed then, which gave me hope and positivity for the future. Something that doesn't occur often.

In all, in regards to the CRJ system I learned that the problems and issues that we may think are unique to our society are actually very universal. People of all cultures deal with the same type of crime, causing the same distress on victims and society. Sure, there are differences in the way things work around the world. Yet, humans still deal with the same emotions, fears, and issues in each corner. Maintaining and enhancing CRJ organizations is not only a national effort, but is trans-national. Needless to say, study abroad is a good idea to anyone that is open to experiencing something new. It not only teaches you independence, but also how to appreciate different cultures and people. It opens your eyes to something that you didn't know existed, and can benefit someone shaping them to be a well rounded person.



Public Policy in Spain

This exclusive study abroad experience is a great opportunity for students to develop a deeper understanding of public policy in another country, helping them to become more well-rounded graduates in an increasingly globalized world.

Program Information

  • Dates: 2015 dates TBD
  • Credits: 3 Credit Hours
  • CRJ 6343 Study Abroad: International Criminal Justice (Graduate); CRJ 4843 Study Abroad: International Criminal Justice (undergraduate)
  • UG – sophomores or above 2.5+ GPA; Graduate Students – 3.0 GPA, and 6 hours completed
  • No special language skills are required, but Spanish would be helpful
  • Program Fees for Participation - $2900 per person + tuition and fees
  • You must have a valid passport!
  • Deposit and fee information for 2015 TBD.

Fee Includes:

  • Round-trip airfare
  • Bus throughout trip
  • 10 nights of hotels (double occupancy)
  • Meals as specified by itinerary
  • 24-hour worldwide emergency service
  • Business and academic visits on tour where specified

How to Apply

  • Fill out an Enrollment Form and return it to the Policy Studies Center office located at Buena Vista (BV) 4.304, Monday - Friday, 8:00am - 5:00pm.
  • Submit your non-refundable deposit to fiscal services using the deposit slip included in the enrollment packet and bring the receipt to the Policy Studies Center.

What Students Have To Say About The Trip:

“It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see a country’s history and I am so thankful that I experienced it firsthand. I was thankfully one of the lucky ones who got the chance to see [Spain’s] Supreme Court.”

~Marlene Valadez~

“Today we visited the Supreme Court in Alicante, Spain. I admire the program they have for women, it helps to inform them about the law in relation to abuse and rape. It is so liberating to know that law makers are willing to do that for victims of domestic abuse.”

~Leonard Chavez~

“I like the fact that Alicante’s system is working towards re-offenders/family violence/women victims and domestic violence. It seems to have a huge impact on the crime rates in the area.”

~Darcelle Wolfgang~

“I learned so much today, but one of the main points that stuck out to me was that Spain is made up of different provinces. There was so much interesting history to learn! I plan on looking at Spain with a new respect - the country is so rich in heritage and full of expression.”

~Tiffany Barrera~

For more information, contact:

Roger Enriquez, J.D.
Associate Professor
Buena Vista Building (BV) 4.304
210.458.2691 voice
210.458.2680 fax
roger.enriquez@utsa.edu

Undergraduate Program

Directory of Internship Placements

Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice

The Department of Criminal Justice offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminal Justice, which provides the opportunity for comprehensive study of criminal justice, and a Minor in Criminal Justice. Students completing the Bachelor of Arts degree may pursue professional careers in government or the private sector as well as apply for admission to law or graduate schools.

The minimum number of semester credit hours required for this degree, including the Core Curriculum requirements, is 120. Thirty-nine of the total semester credit hours required for the degree must be at the upper-division level. Criminal Justice majors, through consultation with faculty advisors, should choose elective courses from Core Curriculum requirements that will enhance their awareness of the complex social and cultural issues confronting contemporary American society.

All candidates for this degree must fulfill the Core Curriculum requirements and the degree requirements.

Important Links:

                                                                                        

WE NOW OFFER TOURS OF THE DOWNTOWN CAMPUS!  

If you're a prospective student click here to schedule a tour.  Bring a guest or family member.  It's that simple.         

Check out our E-brochure!


Check out our first promotional video on YouTube for the College of Public Policy.  

For more information, contact:

Downtown Undergraduate Advising Center
Buena Vista (BV) Building, Room 1.304
210.458.2550 voice
210.458.2575 fax
dtadvising@utsa.edu

Office Hours: Monday - Friday
8:00am - 5:00pm

Prospective Student Information

Prospective Student Information

Anyone interested in becoming a part of our program, please contact our Graduate Advisor of Record, Dr. Corey Sparks.

Follow us on  Facebook!

UTSA Graduate School Prospective Student Page - Here you will find information on applying to UTSA, the San Antonio area, funding sources, and special information for military veterans and international applicants.

International Student Services

Information on San Antonio

City Homepage

Wikipedia Entry

Financial Aid

Apply for IDSER Applied Demography Scholarship

UTSA Office of Financial Aid has several graduate scholarships


Characteristics of Recent Students

We offer admission for fall entry on a selective basis. We require the GRE for all applicants, recent averages (on the new GRE scale) for our accepted students are 152 Quantitative and 152 Verbal. More information on admissions and applying can be found below.

We accept students from a wide variety of academic disciplines. Here is a breakdown of our recently accepted students Masters degree fields. While the majority of our students come from social science disciplines, we have several students from statistics departments, MBA programs and a variety of health fields.

Current Employment of Our Graduates

We are pleased to say that we have 100% placement of our Ph.D. graduates. We do not, however always send students into the academy, and have a wide range of employment for our gradutes. Our program prepares our graduates for opportunities in many fields and here is a breakdown of our recent graduates.

Dissertation topics of our graduates

Below is a listing of our graduates and their respective dissertation titles.

Name Graduation Date Dissertation Title
Mary Bollinger May 2010 Obesity and Place: A Study of the South Texas Veterans
Health Care System (STVHCS) User Population
Mike Cline August 2010 Adapting To Car Culture: The Process of Immigrant Transportation
Assimilation in New Gateway Cities
Miguel Flores August 2010 NAFTA and Determinants of Mexico’s Internal Migration: 1995 – 2005
Eliza Hernandez August 2010 Persistence and degree attainment: The role of individual
decision-making, various forms of capital, and institutional factors
among Mexican-American undergraduate students
Deborah Perez August 2010 Predictors of Ethnic Identification for Children of Hispanic Intermarried Couples: Ethnic Leakage?
Jennifer Roth August 2010 Veteran Health and Health Care in the United States  and Texas: a Mixed Methods Approach
Marguerite Sagna August 2010 Inequalities in utilization of maternal health services in Uganda
David Armstrong May 2011 Massachusetts’ Health Care Reform: The Effects of Chapter 58
on Uninsurance and the Determinants of Uninsurance
Joseph Campbell May 2011 Poor People and Poor Places: Local Opportunity Structures and Poverty Transitions
Mary Hogan May 2011 Public Health Crisis – Obesity: Individual Risks and Causes
Emma Mancha May 2011 Inadequate Parity Standardization in Hispanic Birth Projections
Gilbert Suarez May 2011 Acculturation and Contraceptive Use Among Latino Adolescents in the U.S.
Alelhie Valencia May 2011 A Comparative Analysis of Intimate Partner Violence Using an Ecological Framework
Alma Martinez-Jimenez December 2011 Individual determinants associated with fasting glucose levels and
environmental factors associated with diabetes prevalence
Victoria Locke May 2012 Calling it out: The Role of Institutional Racism in Disparities in Educational Outcomes
Samantha John December 2012 Youth Risky Sexual Behavior in Guyana: An Ecological Perspective
Chun-Lin Lin December 2012 The Effect of Spatial Access on Utilization of Health Care Services Among the Elderly
Frank Martinez III December 2012 Las Colonias de la Frontera: A Study of Substandard Housing Settlements along the Texas-Mexico Border
Ke Meng December 2012 The Relationship between Children’s Health and Mother’s Employment
and Labor Force Participation: A Multilevel Analysis
Brian Munkombwe May 2013 Rural-Urban Migration and Child Mortality in Zambia: Effects of
Migrant Selectivity, Contraceptive Use and Birth Spacing
Carlos Valenzuela December 2013 An analysis of household energy use by racial/ethnic composition:
Consumption, efficiency, and lifestyles
Jinny Case December 2013 Spousal Homogamy and Marital Dissolution in the Highly Educated
Scientist and Engineering Population of the United States
Sadasivan Karuppusamy December 2013 The Determinants and Trends in the Household Energy Consumption
for Different End Uses in the United States during 2001-2009
Susanne Schmidt December 2013 Inequalities in Injury Risk in U.S. Adults: Socioeconomic Status,
Health Behaviors, and Contextual Determinants of Injury Morbidity and Mortality
Jeffrey Howard May 2014 An examination of racial/ethnic and socioeconomic differentials in
allostatic load biomarkers and the subsequent effects on mortality
outcomes in the United States
John Garza May 2014 Spatially Oriented Demographic Determinants of Foreclosures in Bexar County
Alexis Santos May 2015 Inequalities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Female Adolescents in the United States
Ramona Serban August 2015 Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Access to Primary Care: A Spatial Approach to
Determining the Effects of Residential Segregation, Socioeconomic Status
and Health Factors on Access to Primary Care in U.S. Adults
Matthew Martinez August 2015 Dropout Legacy: Exploring the Effects of Historic Neighborhood Contexts
on Contemporary Individual and Neighborhood Dropout Behavior

Mikiko Oliver August 2015 Population Aging and Economic Growth in the United States and Japan
Heidy Colón-Lugo December 2015 Lost to Care: Individual and Neighborhood Characteristics with the
Out-of-Care HIV Positive Patient Population of an Outpatient HIV/AIDS
Clinic in Bexar County, TX: 2008-2013
Daniel Shinaberry May 2016 An Examination of Racial/Ethnic Differentials in Social Network Use and
the Subsequent Effects on Biomarker Outcomes for Adolescents in the U.S.
Daesung Choi August 2016 Revisiting the Role of Acculturation and Selectivity in the Hispanic Health
Paradox: An Analysis of Health Behaviors, Adult Mortality and Low Birthweight
Mauricio Rodriguez Abreu August 2016 Racial/Ethnic and Gender Differentials in Time-Use: Mexican Immigrants’
Poverty of Time, Gender Division of Labor, and Self-Rated Health 

 Paul Chance Kinnison August 2016 Place Based Variation in Food Insecurity Transitions with Policy Applications 
Pamela Willrodt August 2016 Vietnam-Era Veteran Health: A Life-Course Perspective At The End of Middle Adulthood
Sharon Goodwin May 2017 Veteran status as an explantion fro SES and health differentials for men in the US
Rebecca Adeigbe May 2017 Structural determinants of health: The influence of income inequality, racial residential segregation and social
cohesion on Latino childhood obesity
Xiaoling Liang August 2018 Student outcomes: The role of teacher salary differentials

Resources

Departmental Resources

The department has numerous resources for students. We have a Red Hat Linux research server for use in both coursework and independent research. To apply for access contact Dr. Corey Sparks . The server has commonly used statistical software including SAS, Stata, R and Stat Transfer.

We host a number of restricted and open access survey data sources that are available to students upon completion of the appropriate IRB review. Other restricted data sources are availalbe in the department on non-network workstations, and interested students should contact a faculty member about access. We also host all Census and American Community Survey microdata and summary file data on the server, and all students have access to these data.

All research assistants have shared office space, with typically 2-3 students per office. Each student has their own PC workstation.

Library links for demography

Library guide for demography

Research Activity

We have an active program of faculty and student research in our department.

Our faculty and students regularly publish in peer-reviewed journals and present research at international, national and regional professional societies.


Recent publications:

2016

Holway, Giuseppina Valle, Debra Umberson, and Mieke Beth Thomeer. Forthcoming. “Binge Drinking and Depression: The Influence of Romantic Partners in Young Adulthood.” Society and Mental Health.

Howard, Jeffrey T. and P. Johnelle Sparks. 2016. “Does allostatic load calculation method matter? Evaluation of different methods and individual biomarkers functioning by race/ethnicity and educational level.” American Journal of Human Biology. 28:627-635. DOI:10.1002/ajhb.22843

Howard, Jeffrey and P. Johnelle Sparks. 2016. “The Effects of Allostatic Load on Racial/Ethnic Mortality Differences in the United States.” Population Research and Policy Review 35 (4): 421-443. DOI: 10.1007/s11113-016-9382-4

Sagna, Marguerite and P. Johnelle Sparks. 2016. “Institutional Birth in Uganda: The Interplay of Individual Characteristics, Physical Accessibility, and Social Context.” Women’s Reproductive Health 3(1): 30-44. DOI 10.1080/23293691.2016.1150134

2015

Howard, J and Sparks PJ 2015 The Role of Education in Explaining Racial/Ethnic Allostatic Load Differentials in the United States. Biodemography and Social Biology. 61(1) 18-39. Link.

Sáenz, Rogelio, David G. Embrick, and Néstor Rodríguez (eds.). 2015. The International Handbook of the Demography of Race and Ethnicity. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2015. “The Demography of the Elderly in the Americas: The Case of the United States and Mexico. Pp. 197-223 in W.A. Vega, K.S. Markides, J.L. Angel, and F.M. Torres-Gil (ed.), Challenges of Latino Aging in the Americas. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Sáenz, Rogelio and Karen Manges Douglas. 2015. “A Call for the Racialization of Immigration Studies: On the Transition of Ethnic Immigrants to Racialized Immigrants.” Sociology of Race and Ethnicity 1 (1):166-180. DOI: 10.1177/2332649214559287.

Sáenz, Rogelio, David G. Embrick, and Néstor Rodríguez. 2015. “Introduction: A Framework for Understanding the Race and Ethnic Transition. Pp. 3-20 in R. Sáenz, D.G. Embrick, and N. Rodríguez (eds.),The International Handbook of the Demography of Race and Ethnicity. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer. DOI: 10.1007/978-90-481-8891-8_1.

Montes de Oca, Verónica, Telésforo Ramírez, Nadia Santillanes, San Juanita García, and Rogelio Sáenz. 2015. “Access to Medical Care and Family Arrangements among Mexican Elderly Immigrants Living in the United States.” Pp. 225-245 in W.A. Vega, K.S. Markides, J.L. Angel, and F.M. Torres-Gil (ed.), Challenges of Latino Aging in the Americas. Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Noah A, Landale N and Sparks C. 2015. How Does the Context of Reception Matter? The Role of Residential Enclaves in Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy among Mexican-origin Mothers. Maternal and Child Health. DOI: 10.1007/s10995-015-1696-z. Link

Siebert, Rosemarie, and Joachim Singelmann. 2015. “Regional Poverty and Population Response: A Comparison of Three Regions in the United States and Germany. Comparative Population Studies 40:49-76. Link

Sparks C An examination of disparities in cancer incidence in Texas using Bayesian random coefficient models. PeerJ. DOI: 10.7717/peerj.1283. Link 

2014

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2014. CCF Civil Rights Symposium: The State of Latino Children. Chicago: Council on Contemporary Children. Available at: http://www.contemporaryfamilies.org/state-of-latino-children/.

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2014. “Latinos and the Changing Face of Rural America.” Amerikastudien/American Studies. Forthcoming.

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2014. “Fifty Years of the Deferment of the Dream for Racial Justice: From Hattie Carroll to Trayvon Martin.” Pp. 119-124 in K.J. Fasching-Varner, A. Dixon, R. Reynolds, and K. Albert (eds.), Trayvon Martin, Race, and American Justice: Writing Wrong. Sense Publishers: Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2014. “The U.S. War on Poverty a Half Century Later.” Humanity & Society 38 (2):219-221.

Babjakova, B., A. Bandlerova, D. Brown, A. Kaleta, L. J. Kulcsar, and J. Singelmann (eds). 2014. Social and Economic Transformations Affecting Rural people and Communities in Central and Eastern Europe since 1990. Nitra: Slovak University of Agriculture in Nitra.

Sparks CS and Campbell J  2014 An application of Bayesian methods to small area poverty rate estimates. Accepted at Population Research and Policy Review. Volume 33, Issue 3,pp 455-477. DOI 10.1007/s11113-013-9303-8

Sparks CS 2014Measuring residential segregation using R: So long to Factfinder. Spatial Demography 2014 2(1): 72-78

Yang TC, Shoff C, Black N, Noah A and Sparks CS 2014 Racial segregation and maternal smoking during pregnancy: A multilevel analysis using the racial segregation interaction index. Social Science and Medicine 107: 26-36. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2014.01.030.

Tapia M, Sparks CS and Miller JM 2014Texas Latino prison gangs: Toward a demographic framework for understanding recent changes in social dynamics. The Prison Journal 94:159-179. DOI:10.1177/0032885514524694

2013

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2013. “Rolando Hinojosa’s Klail City: Sociological and Demographic Reflections of a Hometown.” Pp. 198-229 in S. Miller and J.P. Villalobos (eds.), Rolando Hinojosa’s “Klail City Death Trap Series”: A Retrospective, New Directions. Houston: Arte Publico Press.

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2013. “Reflections on the Sociology of Security and Surveillance in the Study of Immigration.” Sociological Forum 28 (3):624-626. [DOI: DOI: 10.1111/socf.12041.]

Sáenz, Rogelio, Karen Manges Douglas, and Maria Cristina Morales. 2013. “Latina/o Sociology.” Pp. 59-68 in D.L. Brunsma, K.E. Iyall Smith, and B.K. Gran (eds.), Handbook of Sociology and Human Rights. Boulder, CO: Paradigm Publishers.

Saenz, Rogelio, Amber Fox, and San Juanita Garcia. 2013. “Latino Elderly in Nonmetro America.” Pp. 115-140 in N. Glasgow and E.H. Berry (eds.), Rural Aging in the 21st Century. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

Douglas, Karen Manges and Rogelio Saenz. 2013. “The Criminalization of Immigrants and the Immigration-Industrial Complex.” Daedalus: Journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences 142 (3):199-227. [DOI: doi:10.1162/DAED_a_00228.]

Montes de Oca, Verónica, San Juanita García, and Rogelio Sáenz. 2013. “Transnational Aging: Disparities Among Aging Mexican Immigrants.” Transnational Social Review: A Social Work Journal 3 (1):65-81.

Montes de Oca, Verónica Zavala y Rogelio Sáenz. 2013. “Estrategias de Apoyo Transnacional Ante el Envejecimiento en México y Estados Unidos.” [“Strategies of Transnational Support in the Face of Aging in Mexico and the United States.”] Pp. 481-528 en V. Montes de Oca (Coordinadora), Envejecimiento en América Latina y el Caribe: Enfoques en Investigación y Docencia de la Red Latinoamericana de Investigación en Envejecimiento. México DF: Instituto de Investigaciones Sociales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.

2013 Sparks PJ, Sparks CS and Campbell J Poverty segregation in nonmetro counties: A spatial exploration of segregation patterns in the US. Spatial Demography. 1:2 pp162-177. Link

2013 Sparks CS, Wood JW and Johnson PL Infant mortality and intra-household competition in the northern islands of Orkney, Scotland, 1855-2001. American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 151:2 pp 1191-201 DOI: 10.1002/ajpa.22264

2013 Sparks CS Spatial Analysis in R: Part 1 Getting data from the ACS into R and Exploratory Spatial

Data Analysis. Spatial Demography 1:1 pp 131-139. Link

2013 Colon-Lugo H and Sparks CS A Study of County Child Poverty Rates in Puerto Rico: Does Space Matter? Spatial Demography 1:1 pp. 96-110. Link

2013 Sparks PJ, Sparks CS and Campbell, J An application of Bayesian spatial statistical methods to the study of poverty segregation and infant mortality rates in the United States. GeoJournal. 78:2 pp. 389-405. DOI 10.1007/s10708-011-9445-3

2013 Van Malderen C, Ogali I, Khasakhala A, Muchiri SN, Sparks CS, Van Oyen H and Speybroeck N Decomposing Kenyan socio-economic inequalities in skilled birth attendance and measles immunization. International Journal for Equity in Health. Link

2012

Campbell J andSparks CSCounty-level poverty estimates for the contiguous United States, 2001, 2005. Journal of Maps 8:4 pp 334-339. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17445647.2012.751061

Hoque, N.Evaluation of small area population estimates produced by Housing Unit, Ratio-correlation, and Component Method II compared to 2000 Census counts. CANADIAN STUDIES IN POPULATION Volume: 39 Issue: 1-2 Pages: 91-108.

Hoque, N.The Implications of Change in Population Size, Distribution, and Composition on the Number of Overweight and Obese Adults and the Direct and Indirect Cost Associated with Overweight and Obese Adults in Texas Through 2040. POPULATION RESEARCH AND POLICY REVIEW Volume: 29 Issue: 2 Pages: 173-191.

Howard, K.J.,Howard, J.T. and Smyth, A. “The problem of absenteeism and presenteeism in the workplace.” In R. Gatchel and I. Schultz (eds.), Handbook of Occupational Health and Wellness. New York: Springer Publishing.

Howard, J.T., andPotter, L.B. An assessment of the relationships between overweight, obesity,
related chronic health conditions and worker absenteeism. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice.

Sáenz, Rogelio. 2012. “Rural Race and Ethnicity.” Pp. 207-223 in L.J. Kulcsár and K.J. Curtis (eds.), International Handbook of Rural Demography. New York: Springer.

Saenz, Rogelio and Carlos Siordia. 2012. “The Inter-Cohort Reproduction of Mexican American Dropouts.” Race and Social Problems 4 (1):68-81. [DOI: http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=arti...

Saenz, Rogelio and Trinidad Morales. 2012. “The Latino Paradox.” Pp. 47-73 in R.R Verdugo (ed.), The Demography of the Hispanic Population: Selected Essays. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing.

Montes de Oca, Verónica, Rogelio Sáenz, and Ahtziri Molina. 2012. “Caring for the Elderly: A Binational Task.” Pp. 293-315 J.L. Angel, F. Torres-Gill, and K. Markides (eds.), Aging, Health, and Longevity in the Mexican-Origin Population. New York: Springer.

Montes de Oca Zavala, Verónica, Rogelio Sáenz, Nadia Santillanes, y Consuelo Izazola-Conde. 2012. “Cuidado a la Salud en la Vejez y Recursos Familiares Transnacionales en México y Estados Unidos.” [“Healthcare to Elderly and Transnational Family Resources in Mexico and the United States’] Uaricha Revista de Psicología 9 (19):85-101.

Sparks PJ and Sparks CSSocioeconomic Position, Rural Residence, and Marginality Differences in Obesity Status in the Adult Mexican Population. International Journal of Population Research. ArticleID 757538 Link

Sparks, P. Johnelle, Corey S. Sparks, and Joey Campbell. “An application of Bayesian spatial statistical methods to the study of racial and poverty segregation and infant mortality rates in the US.” GeoJournal (Available online January 10, 2012) DOI 10.1007/s10708-011-9445-3.

Nuñez, Anne-Marie andP. Johnelle Sparks. “Who are linguistic minority students in higher education? A national perspective.” Pp. 110-129 in Y. Kanno & L. Harklau (Eds.), Linguistic Minority Students Go to College: Preparation, Access, and Persistence. New York: Routledge.

Sparks, P. Johnelle. “Rural Health Disparities.” Pp. 255-271 in Kulscar, L.J. and K. Curtis (Eds.). The International Handbook of Rural Demography. London: Springer.

2011

Montes de Oca, Verónica,Rogelio Sáenz,and Ahtziri Molina. “Caring for the Elderly: A Binational Task.” Forthcoming in J.L. Angel, K.S. Markides, and F. Torres- Gill, Health and Health Care Policy Challenges for Aging Latinos: The Mexican-Origin Population. New York: Springer.

Montes de Oca, Verónica,Rogelio Sáenz, Telesforo Ramírez, and Jennifer Guillén. “Linking Migration, Health, and Ageing in Mexico and the United States: Health in Later Life among Mexican Migrants.” Journal of Ageing and Health.

Sáenz, Rogelioand Aurelia Lorena Murga. Latino Issues: A Reference Handbook.
Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.

Saenz, Rogelio. “The Changing Demography of Latinos in the Midwest.” Pp. 33- 55 in R.O. Martinez, Latinos in the Midwest. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.

Sáenz, Rogelio. “Rural Race and Ethnicity.” Forthcoming in L.J. Kulcsár and K.J. Curtis (eds.), International Handbook of Rural Demography. New York: Springer.

Saenz, Rogelio, Cecilia Menjivar, and San Juanita Edilia Garcia. “Arizona’s SB 1070: Setting Conditions for Violations of Human Rights Here and Beyond.” Pp. 155- 178 in J. Blau and M. Frezzo (eds.), Sociology and Human Rights: A Bill of Rights in the Twenty-First Century. Newbury Park, CA: Pine Forge Press.

Singelmann, Joachim, Tim Slack, and Kayla Fontenot. Forthcoming. “Race and Place: Determinants of Poverty in the Texas Borderland and the Lower Mississippi Delta.” Pp. in L. Kulcsar and K. Curtis (eds.), International Handbook of Rural Demography. New York: Springer Press.

Singelmann, Joachim. “From Central Planning to Markets: 20 Years of Post-Socialist Transformation in an Eastern German County.” Rural Sociology 76 (1).

Singelmann, Joachim, Dudley L. Poston, Jr., andRogelio Saenz. Forthcoming. “Expert Knowledge and Local Knowledge: Poverty Researchers Meet Community Leaders.” Pp.st in D. Swanson and N. Hoque (eds.), Opportunities and Challenges for Applied Demography in the 21 Century. New York: Springer Press.

Sparks CSViolent crime in San Antonio, Texas: An application of spatial epidemiological methods. Spatial and Spatio-temporal Epidemiology. doi:10.1016/j.sste.2011.10.001

Sparks CSParental investment and socioeconomic status influences on children's height in Honduras: An analysis of national data. American Journal of Human Biology 23(1) 80-88. Link

Sparks, P. Johnelle. “Racial/Ethnic Differences in Breastfeeding Duration Among WIC-Eligible Families.” Women’s Health Issues, 21(5): 374-382.

Sparks, P. Johnelleand Mary Bollinger.“A Demographic Profile of Obesity in the Adult and Veteran US Populations in 2008.” Population Research and Policy Review 30(2): 211-233.

Nuñez, Anne-Marie,P. Johnelle Sparks, and Eliza A. Hernandez. Latino access to community colleges and Hispanic-Serving Institutions. Journal of Hispanic Higher Education. 10(1): 18-40.

Recent meeting presentations:

2014

Sparks CS and Valencia Intimate Partner Violence in Peru: An assessment of competing models. Paper presented at the Population Association of America Annual Meeting, Boston MA Link.

Singelmann J, Sparks CS and Martinez M Are demographic indicators the correct gauge for measuring socioeconomic impacts of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill? Paper presented at the Rural Sociological Society Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA. 

2013

Noah A, Schoff C, Black NC and Sparks CS How Does the Context of Reception Matter? : The Role of Residential Enclaves on Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy for Mexican-origin Mothers. Paper presented at the IUSSP Meeting, Busan, South Korea.

Romero, F, Poston D and Sparks CS The Hispanic Epidemiological and Criminological Paradoxes. Poster presented at the IUSSP Meeting, Busan, South Korea.

Schoff C, Yang TC, Black NC and Sparks CS Does Racial Segregation Aggravate or Alleviate the Association between Race/Ethnicity and Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy: A Multilevel Analysis. Poster presented at the Population Association of America Meeting, New Orleans, LA.

Sparks CS and Sparks PJ A Spatial Analysis of Changing Segregation Patterns in the United States between 1990 and 2010 Paper presented at the Southwestern Social Science Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans 

2012

Case, JinnyUsing the language of demography to talk about college student transfer and attrition. Paper presented at the Consortium for Student Retention Data Exchange (CSRDE), New Orleans, LA.

Case, JinnyOccupation and marriage in highly educated scientists and engineers. Paper presented at the Applied Demography Conference, San Antonio, TX.

Hoque, N., Howard, J.T., Flores, M. US Population: Change in Size, Composition, and Distribution, 2000-2010. Poster presentation at 2012 Annual Meeting of the Southern Demographic Association, Williamsburg, VA.

Hoque, N., Howard, J.T., Flores, M. US Population: Change in Size, Composition, and Distribution, 2000-2010. Oral paper presentation at 2012 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Chicago, IL.

Howard, J.T.and Howard, K.J. Barriers to healthcare utilization for individuals with chronic upper extremity joint pain: results from the national health interview survey. Poster presentation at 2012 Annual Meeting of the American Pain Society, Honolulu, HI.

Hoque, N. and Howard, J.T.The Implications of Future Demographic Change on the Incidence of Diseases/Disorders in Texas, 2000-2040. Poster presentation at 2012 Applied Demography Conference, San Antonio, TX.

Sánchez-Soto, G “Mexico-U.S. Migration and the Intergenerational Educational Mobility of Youth in Mexico.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, San Francisco, CA.

Santos Lozada, AlexisTransformation of medical-hospital services in Puerto Rico from 1993 until 2010. Research Centers in Minority Institutions (RCMI) International Symposium on Health Disparities. San Juan, PR. Photo

Sparks CSandSchmidt, SA Socio-ecological model of injury mortality in Texas using Bayesian models. Poster presented at the Southern Demographic Association meeting, Williamsburg, VA poster

Valencia L and Sparks CSFertility Control in the Context of Intimate Partner Violence among Women in Liberia. Paper presented at the Southern Demographic Association meeting, Williamsburg, VA

Campbell J andSparks CSAn application of Bayesian methods to small area poverty rate estimates. Paper presented at the Population Association of America annual meeting, San Francisco, CA.

2011

Sánchez-Soto, G“The Impact of Mexico-U.S. Migration in the Family and the Community on Current Work and School Status of Mexican Youth.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, Washington, D.C.

Sparks CS and Karuppusamy SA spatial analysis of health disparities in Texas using Bayesian hierarchical models. Paper presented at the Southern Demographic Association annual meeting, Tallahassee, FL.

Sparks CSA Bayesian analysis of Hispanic and Non-Hispanic fertility rates in the United States. Paper presented at the Rural Sociological Society annual meeting, Boise, ID.

Sparks PJ, Sparks CSand Campbell J Poverty Segregation in Nonmetro Counties: A Spatial Exploration of Segregation Patterns in the U.S. Paper presented at the Population Association of America Annual meeting, Washington D.C.

Schmidt, Susanne and P. Johnelle Sparks. “Socioeconomic, Behavioral and Contextual Determinants of Non-fatal Injury Risk among Young Adults in the United States.” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Demographic Association, Tallahassee, Florida.

Sparks, P. Johnelle and Susanne Schmidt. “The Impact of Different Dimensions of Residential Segregation on Prematurity Status of Infants.” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southern Demographic Association, Tallahassee, Florida.

Sparks, P. Johnelle and Susanne Schmidt. "A Demographic Analysis of Metro/Nonmetro Differences in Adult Overweight and Obesity." Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Boise, Idaho.

Nunez, Anne-Marie andP. Johnelle Sparks. “Understanding Postsecondary Trajectories of Linguistic Minority Students.” Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association, New Orleans, Louisiana.